Branding Banter
Branding Banter

Season 2, Episode 8 · 1 year ago

S2 EP8 - RØDE Microphones

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

🎙 It’s time for some more banter!

In this episode, we’re shining our banterous spotlight and microphones on the Aussie beacon of audio gear, RØDE.

Founded originally in 1967, RØDE has become an industry leader in quality, Australian made audio equipment for the everyday creator, prosumer and professional audio producers.

Safe to say the choice of this Aussie brand was Frank’s as he’s such a fanboy. But when you dig below the surface to realise what makes their brand, it’s clear that it’s much loved and highly reviewed by it’s customers. Especially when they support their customers with a great brand experience to amplify the brand’s position as a market leader.

So for us in this episode we’re identifying RØDE as a brand that is not known for its messaging, unlike some of the other brands we’ve covered. But more for their distinctive assets and community building experiences to support creatives.

That, and their products are pretty cool…just saying (says Frank).

🎙 Where to find more about Delphie & Frank

Branding Banter on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brandingbanter/

Delphie Website: https://www.seecreative.com.au/

Delphie Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/seecreativestudio/

Frank Website: https://www.gdayfrank.com/

Frank Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/gdayfrank/

Hey, frank. Good, a healthy time to start the banter. Yeah, let's go branding banter. Good and welcome to branding banter, the podcast that shines a spotlight on Australian businesses for business owners, brand consultants and designers, so that we can identify how a brand helps a business connect with their consumers, while of course, having a bit of a back and forth between each other, a banter, as we call it, about a featured Ozzie brand each week. I'm your hostealthy, and this is my co host, frank, and before we'd begin, we just like to acknowledge the traditional owners of the land in which we're both recording the podcast on today. I'm on the beautiful coast or why Jack Country and frank is on the mountainous Gandangara country. We pay our respects to the elders past, present and emerging. As Co hosts of branding banter, we individually run our own branding consultancies from two different sides of Australia. So frank runs get a franc from the blue mountains west of Sydney, while I run sea creative from Perth in Western Australia. All righty, it is this episode eight, where he like he can hate to some. I think maybe so every thing in in China. China, yea, yeah, that aside talking about China Today. Welcome to an episode of Ranning Banter. He obviously again on clubhouse. If you ever want to join us, please do otherwise, I know you're a lot of you watch this back, watch back, listen to this bad listened. Yeah, I never say listen straight up. It's always have to create myself. We have to we have to be a little we had to apologize after last week's episode. I have spoken to a couple of people who have listened and they were like, yeah, that was a little bit hectic. We wear a little bit alone, Washer lastic, but but still took lots of, you know, beneficial information from our discussion on Australia past. So I think, I think, although, although we were maybe there was something going. What do we say? It was richer Accuri Rick. Apparently. I was not even know what the hell that means. That I know, neither do. I'd be coming out. Let's just blame that this this week we're going I'm trying to stick to stick to the topic, which is good because it's some actually something that's very close to your heart. Frank's into that food. I'm feeling fresh, which is nice. I showed my beard today. Not Fall off, but I look, you know, five years younger or five I've lost five pillows. Either one. So I think how that happens or the hair cut doesn't it. It's really just well, I think it's that whole transformation idea. You know which is which in this like if we kind of link it to branding, it's actually what a refresh does to you know, the same way as a refresh to you, brand kind of does the same thing, like a right there bringing it back great. Everything comes back to broad this branding is the essence of all. If you watch like the gag, I suppose that's that's what that hold. You see the reveals and they do the transformation. All I have as a haircut. The bugs look totally shabby as they make them look as shabby as hell before they go in the show. Give him a trim. Trim their beard, trim their big afrow. Know, while not they got in their head and they're like, Oh my God, you look so amazing. It's like, seriously, just change the clothes and cut your different, but it I think it. I think what it does, though, frank the difference is it actually in like internally, like there's an obvious transformation, and so it actually helps you embrace something new within you. And said, that's actually what comes through in that like confidence. So yes, the confiss that's confidence. That yeah, absolutely so, when you've had that heat like, especially if you've, if we're it like for you having carried like that, you know, long hair, not being able to have your hair cut, beer growing long like, and that kind of linked very closely to Oh my gosh, we've been in lockdown forever and now there's this like new fresh start of I we're out of lockdown, I can get a haircut, I can shave my it. I actually feel, you know, renewed and refreshed. So yeah, good for you. I'm glad. I, however, and the other side and feel completely like exhausted. But that's okay. I've always got energy for the podcast, so that's lucky for us. Time for Nice pampering message or something, I know, or just a break from all the things. But anyways, that's feel good. I'm excited. Today we need a barbecue, barbecue sank place everywhere today. Boom, boom, boom. Kin Do multiple sounds at once. So, ...

...in terms of this, this is the Ozzy bbq, the Ozzie braining band of quiz. You'll have heard it by now, surely, if you've been listening to our show, and thank you for tuning in each week. Thank you again. Still traded. We want to trade back at page paint, attending whatever. This week I am the Trivia Quiz question master. Dude, no beard, delphy, can you name two words that were combined to make the ozzy kids stationary brand smiggle? I'm gonna go smile and Giggle. Look at that. Yeah, this one, that's a better one, thing being yeah, that's good, right on the money. Yeah, I have I don't know anything about them other than that they my kids like this style. I have never never really anything from. Yeah, they're quite Australians. Yeah, so I worked across looked across from want of US shopping morels. We're an apple store, and there was one right across the other side of the building and I never went in there. I've always walk past. It just look too intent, intent and I'm like, I'm not any sharpen it. That looks like sensory overload, my God, but do you have a lot of smelly stuff like that's why my kids like it. Okay, like this, the text has smell and the right you know, like that's all that sort of they've got really cool. Yeah, it's like we've gone in there quite a bit, but I do actually didn't know their Australian, so maybe we should hook them in for another I'll give you a little by just so you get a bit of a context of who they are. They rapidly growing since two thousand and two. They started on Chapel Street in South Jerra in Melbourne. Yeah, Victoria, fifteen stores within five years and then the company was sold to a bigger business called the just group two thousand and seven, like thirty million dollars, which is pretty good to the growth plan. Today they have two hundred ninety stores across seventy seven countries. That's crazy. Yeah, that's huge. Yeah, the small stores, but still great. Six. Yeah, they're quite they've got that sort of not to be culturally inappropriate, but I think that's sort of land on that real interest of that Japanese style stationery, you know, where there's lots of characters going on and like lots of it's really like it's making stationary incredibly fun. Yeah, so kids want to kind of use it and engage in it and, you know, it makes that creativity enjoyable as well. And so I think that it's sort of certainly got its own look and feel that, when you like, you could pick a sniggle from a mile away if you're in a store. And and it's definitely becoming that that brand like a bit like we've spoken about before with hoover being like the name for vacuum cleaners. If you want like a stationery, you'd say I want smiggle this. Yeah, and it might not necessarily be a smile thing, but it's kind of talking about the smile Pencil case or the SMIGGLE, you know. So they it's it's associated especially in the kids circles, the school kids circles, for cool stationary items. Yeah, very interesting. Well, that's that's a clever because that's smiling giggle. I mean maybe had I not known I never thought of what the brand was, I might have not known, but definitely it does make you smile and Giggle like it's fun. So yeah, it's very that's a very clever name. Thanks. That was a good one. Like you brought out hoover. Just sit total sidetrack again here. Watched the hoover addors on one of those, you know, infomercial things. It was the worst product demonstration to ever seen because they're like Oh, he's how you can moppen and clean your carpet, but it was on like a plastic mat, like an outdoor picnic plastic mat. Look picks up. I'm like that's we've got one of them the carpet. So anyway, that aside, this week we are talking about one of my favorite brands because I have a counter. Just before I got on here, five of their products on my desk in front of me. Your desk is full. Third that is pretty choker. You were surrounded. Yeah, and then there's like another shelf in my office here of a wholly et morgear of the is and it's called road microphones. If you've ever heard of it, you might not have. It is, a guess, a fairly niche product, which will get into. But they are a product business. They do audio recording hardware and software. Now they were first established in one thousand nine hundred and sixty seven, so nearly fifty five years old and we picked the brand because I'm a total fan boy. But they make it every day kind of microphones that you could use for your phone, for your camera, recording things, for any content you might make, even up to the professional level, at an affordable price. They're not out of reach products, which is I think, just makes it a nice brand to engage with and I think at the end of the day, you don't see too many...

...ozzy tech brands around making products, at least on sure, manufactured here in Australia, which, yeah, because that's the big pantler. But that was one of the key things really, wasn't it? That maybe this one stand out for us is that they've kept manufacturing on in Australia, whereas even when we spoke about Kauwhala, for instance, they ended up shipping that oversea traction. Yeah, so you definitely in terms of like looking up to a brand and you know, seeing that they're maintaining that importance of keeping it here in Australia. That's one of the key things. That road for us has been really been really interesting and why we want to kind of tap into them. Takes about so yeah, exactly. So it was founded by Henry Freedman and they had freedom electronics in Sydney and then his son. Is that what happens? Yea, yeah, started his son. Yes, started road Peter because he, I thought he had bought a I read that he bought a microphone that came from China or from China and then banged it. Yeah, yeah, and then he was like why we're not doing this here? Yeah. So, yeah, really interesting kind of backstory to that. Yeah, and so, yeah, now they have over two hundred and fifty employees and export to a hundred and seventeen countries for consumer, prosumer and professional customer base. So it's like hugely. You know, it's global. Well, what's not about it has a very good reputation about it. But yeah, we'll get into that. So what we want to do here is to a broad critique of road, to look at their strategy and how they connects with the consumers so that we can be that little bit more aware about what goes into the branding process for something like road, but also something that you can consider for your own brand, to make those puzzle pieces all come together and hopefully it makes us all better decision make because when it comes to building run brands as the brands we talk about in this podcast. We've chosen a real kicking goals for the most part. So, yeah, that's said. Let's dig in here, starting with the target market and positioning, because this isn't a brand. It's all in terms of the branding. It's it's visual focus and product focus and then brain experience. There's not too much messaging. So we're going to start a bit different. Yeah, some of the other ones that we've done, and I think, I think what's Nice about this, although they're sort of in a bunch of other countries, they're very much a niche they've got a very niche market in that sense that they they're they're big enough now like to, you know, to expand into countries. But at the same time, if you're not, if you're not in the market for looking for a microphone like so, if you're not in some sort of productions place in your business, whether that's even like personal like vlogging or blogging or whatever like that, you can be blogged vlogging. I got to get my termulating instagram. FEMINIS A friend, yeah, who are podcasting, but yeah, but you probably wouldn't know. You need this until you've sort of taken a few steps into right I want to start creating something that you know has a better quality. So in terms of then market it's very edis, you know, niche and that sense, like I wouldn't have no own about them before talking to you. Yeah, when when I needed to get a microphone MM. So you know, it's that kind of thumb, whereas you have all that experience in film and Television. Yeah, but even it is still like I wouldn't I wouldn't have known about them until you need, like I needed the product. It was really that I saw working in TV, some of our social media team using them for behind the scenes kind of content for the TV shows that we're working on, and I was like, Oh, that looks like pretty cool kind of thing. Let's have a look into it. And they were really affordable. Like the MIC that I first bought is a road video mic. I still have it. Looking right at it, it's it's above the camera. It's a great quality shotgun microphone and it was about a hundred and something dollars, and that was back in two thousand and twelve. So really affordable. Really afford it. But in terms of like the way that they position themselves. We mentioned it before, of being for consumers, everyday consumers. Yeah, at a yeah, entry level, all the way to what you call a prosumer, so using, yea, these products, to use it for commercial purposes, and then all the way out to professional industry, which is, you know, for broadcast TV or movies or whatever, because I do make a whole range of different products, either level Aer mics, which those little ones you see the news readers kind of wearing. I'm strongly yeah, sure, I'm all about, to microphones that can go on the tope of the camera, to podcast microphones, to music microphones, and then shotgun microphones, which is like a long, thin cylinder like that you'd have out of camera. You wouldn't even see it. That they use a lot for them to use out of frame, which pick up a really...

...good, good sound, and even for instruments too. And yes, you know, singing like microphones, that kind of stuff. So really bad people would use their mic on, you know, on set, and yeah, you know that. Yeah, they'd be used, as you said, in professional industries a lot. So there's sort of it's interesting guided because they've they've they had are making things that are appropriate for entry level, as you said, but I feel like in a lot of you know the stuff that they've they're selling. It's really lucky you know something about it before you you know, you know kind of a capacity, I guess, of what a microphone can do or what it's needed for. Before you'd maybe look to them as well, so that they've got products that, yeah, can you can afford at an entry level when you're not really sure that you need to be a professional. Yeah, and I think it's pretty akin to probably how apple have done it, where they were very prosumer you know, the technis that wanted a computer and everyone was like, I don't, what do I need a computer for? Kind of thing, to now where people want to capture audio and make their own fun podcast whatever. So they make these products that are super simple and software that you can just plug into your computer, plug in, for us, beat mics and have like a party kind of podcast, to make it a very accessible avenue of tech. That's not to Oh my God, I need this cable and this inter face and all these because it can become a real classifucking stuff. Yeah, yeah, and even for podcast. So not podcasting, zoom calls at home calls that you won't want to do with clients. You might want to sound better than just using the microphone that's built into laptop or your desktop. You know, having a professional mic on hand can elevate that professionalism when you're working from home. And that's exactly I mean. Even the other day I said that to you. I was like, I'm doing so many zoom calls now and really sense that, you know, it's not working as well as I think it could. And so you especially when you need to create that or you you know, you want to get it as close to in person experience as possible, and I do think all of those things play a big part in you know, all of that tech around. Just zoom is can really help lift your game in that stay in you know, in communicating with your customers as well. So yeah, I as you said, I think that there's they're really kind of got abroad a broad product range, but in terms of their target market it's still quite niche in that it ye who are creating some kind of you know in them, for the most part, creating some kind of content or production of something that they they need. I think even you know, even if you're saying talking about zoom. You know that's still kind of doing something where you're maybe you're running meetings or you're doing something where you actually need to you know, they needs a professional capacity in s sense as well. So yeah, so I think they're. I think in terms of their competitors, what's interesting is that there's probably, you know, while there are competitors, there's nothing that's in Australia, and so there's that. You've said here that there was a few different ones. Like I know I've got a beaut a blue yetti microphone, which I probably could have got a road one at the same time. Like that would have been but I just listened to you at the time. So yeah, I mean that's the thing. Like when we started this whole podcasting thing, I bought a blue Yedie because that was an affordable desk kind of microphone that was easily accessible and uses owed and all the rest of I could get it from JB hi Fi. It was it was just easy. Yep, it was easy. In terms of road products, they're not sold in those t quillers sort of stores like the Harvey Normans, or they're in specialty kind of stores and they don't sell direct to consumer either, which is quite unique, I think, for the size of the brand that they are. You know, having a shipping facility within it would make perfect sense for a brand like what they have. But well, especially if they want that consumer market, then next sort of ruling them out by not setting direct to consumer, aren't they? I mean, yeah, they it's not to say that they don't have an experience where the customers and looked after, especially after sales support and warranties and all the rest of which into at the end of this. But in terms of buying something, you need to typically go to a specialty audio store or came a store, yeah, to find their gear, which plays into the niche aspect of things and, you know, for being less consumer and a little bit more leaning towards prosumer and Professional. But in terms of that in itself, sorry, I was going to say that in itself is ruling out. You know, we're not ruling out, but they're making a decision around how they want to sell the product and where they want to invest their energy, and I also think that feeds into a little bit around their messaging, because when you've decided not to be direct to consumer, like via your website. You're actually really saying I don't want to deal with the all those questions, like I'm taking out that hole, you...

...know, all the people who are not sure like that. If they they're unsure, they can talk to the sales person in the shop. Like we don't want to spend time kind of doing with that thing for the sales part of it, kind of for the support aspect. They're the tech support people. So if you have any problems with it, you send it to road yet or it's all right now? If it's if it's dead on arrival, then you take it back to the place you bought it from, obviously, but I think with them they have, I think, something like six thousand distributor stores around the world. Yeah, and then makes sense. I mean, to go to some way that that person trust to get all the gift from in general rather than going for one specific thing might make more sense. It's a little bit a hard one to kind of gage, but looking at the rest of the competitors, I don't think any of them really sell direct to market themselves. Yeahway, so they competitors stores. Yeah, the competitors are shure. Send highs a Logitech, which owns blue yetti microphones that we use the cut their brands call blue, and then another one called Boyer, which is very similar to what roads cell, and then Sony and then there's another one called Zoom, which I haven't listed here in my notes, but zooms another one, not the same as the brand you would be familiar with that we mentioned before of doing live video calls. It's just another brand called zoom that does a lot of microphone stuff. So where they fit there? I think they're quite quite. I said, they're very well respected in this kind of space. I don't see any of their products having less than a five star review, which is really interesting, and not just, you know, twenty reviews, like talking like six eight hundred reviews of some of these microphones you might see in a google search. So it really is. It gets a testament to the love and affection for a brand that does the job it should do and it I I've had no problems with their products. They've always performed, unless I've needed to change your battery and one of my mics, but the voice performed. They're never conked out or anything like that. Obviously taking care of them, but their quality products and I think if you pick up a product, not having any knowledge about road before that, you see what Australian made. They don't make a big song and dance about it, but you see it's made in Sydney, in Australia, and their headquarters are in Sittey too, not Perth, that it's like, oh, that's that's a big plus, that that's fantastic. Yeah, and I actually was thinking about that in terms of like I wonder, for an overseas market, how that like in Australia we if something is Australian made of was made in Germany, if it's made in like Sweden. Yeah, yeah, like that. Well, there's cert's, there's certain countries where we go. That's going to we it's a signaling to it being better quality. Yeah, so, without even necessarily knowing you, if you had a if you're too products. One was made in China, one was made in Germany, the signaling to you is the German product is probably quite mass produced. Sorry, the Chinese product is probably quite mass produced. There's chances that it's probably going to be fine but it might not last the test of time, whereas the German one, we've got this signaling that are okay in Germany. Yeah, there's this press exactly all of those words that we've attached to German made and people already know that when you hear those terms. And so I'm wondering for people outside of an Australian market where the when they hear Australian made, what that signals to them, because if within Australia we've got an expectation that that's going to be of really high standards because it's kept local, we've got high, you know, work standards, I suppose, and you know, ethical standards in most for the most part. So you know, you kind of think, okay, that's got, that's good quality. But I wonder if for the overseas like at whether that does I don't have an answer this question, but I'm wondering if that does have what people think from an overseas market, is something that's made in Australia really, you know, perceived or signaled as a high quality product, because that would be interesting in terms of, you know, where it comes to the competiting, competing market, then is it just down on price, or is it down on you know, word of mouth or whatever it is? That's kind of triggered that purchase. Yeah, and I think that's probably a good point. Like even send highs of their German made and so, yeah, that's why they're probably an even level playing field across the board of making very similar products to what road make. But some of the others, yeah, Chinese made. Not to say that the bad quality. That every mark that I've had an experience with or audio product, with those other brands. I haven't never, never bought a boyer product yet bought sure or I've had an experience with sure. Sorry. What send highser what blue? What's Sony ones as well? Have tried. I've got a zoom actually as well. Or quality products. The yeah, there's nothing wrong with them at all. I just like the fact that it's Australian made and being an Australian buying something the training. I think that's a huge win. Yeah, yeah, we definitely exactly and it does feel you know, I...

...think that's a part of why you want to buy it at the beginning and then when you know that it's really good and you're really happy with the product and it feels like you know you're going to I think it's other way around it. I guess says whether I think I can sell the way around. You buy the product, I feel really great and then, Oh, it's Australian, fantastic, that's even I feel good. Yeah, absolutely, yeah, and then but then, I think it's what I was going to say, is it leads you back to buying more. Oh yeah, and that was that was so we we talked about this in the buying behavior. But I think that's one of the interesting things in terms of their positioning is that if you have an entry level product and you keep doing the thing that you're doing well, you actually can kind of grow with the brand. So, you know, like if you become exactly exactly. So it's a really clever way of being able to meet a market kind of where they're at, but then having, you know, could you because you don't imagine a microphone something and a replace. Hopefully, if you're buying something good quality, you're not expecting that you're going to replace it every, you know, two years. So what they're, you know, doing in that sense is actually creating like the full scope of mics for professional services so you can actually keep, you know, a very professional producers, so you can actually keep upgrading as you're as you grow as a business or, you know, you see the needs to keep growing. So, yeah, I think it's, you know, a clever it's clever marketing in that sense, because they're really kind of got the full scope of those content creators covered. Yeah, and it kind of carrying them through exactly. And in terms of content creators like the the creating cat like product categories as well. So, in terms of and four, they release their road video mic, which is what I use now, yeah, which a board in two thousand and twelve. So that a product has been around for, you know, twenty, nearly twenty years now. I think there's been some iterations and there's some other variations of it, but it it created a category of the first compact on camera microphone so that when people would pick picking up cameras to make youtube content, this was making it a lot, a lot more accessible of not having to wear a separate microphone or anything like that. Is having something that's on camera, that can point at the person that's been shot and talked talking to camera kind of thing. Or even Vloggers, like some individuals like Casey Nice, that, let's say it, and puts a camera in front of their face I've done that. I use that in that same way. It makes it very, very easy to produce something without having to worry about a whole heap of other gear. But that was, yeah, that was an industry kind of leading product and others have emerged from it. But then they're also been a key player in the podcasting space. So when podcasting came first to light two thousand and seven, there was a bit of a boom then, like there is kind of over the last two years or so, they started bringing out products that were adapted for that use. So they brought out one called the the podcaster mic, and that was, I think it's a USB mic that looks like a broadcast market. You'd see Radio People Dj's and that using yeah, really like pro level looking thing, but still at accessible product to make that at home experience or even in studios if you wanted to do a podcast or professionally, whatever it might be, at a more affordable price and accessible price. But then they've expanded that so much more now, like I've got this roadcaster prod deck. There's some photos of it in our post on instagram and we publish this, Everi so that you can have a look at and it makes that whole experience that next level up of production value to have a broadcast desk for audio like you would in a radio studio, but in front of you. And it's portable, and I mean it's big. It's bigger than they foresheet a paper, but it looks cool, it works well and it does the job very, very well. Like I use this thing to even make calls now with my clients. I can record those calls if needed. I mean obviously I'm telling the person if I'm recording, but all these things that can be done in really cool ways. But sorry, well, I was no, no, I think that what you're saying is really interesting because you had the sort of person who's really embraced all this. Yes, but not everyone is got like that. To more be heading for some people yet. So even for me, luck researching them today, it was really interesting, because it's not that I don't want to be good, but I do feel like you, you definitely need a level of understanding before delving into this. Otherwise it feels like completely out of your depth. And so I think that if we talk back to like who it's kind of marketing to, is it really they are going? They are talking to people who have some idea. Like they have to have some knowledge to start with, because absolutely for me, like as soon as I kind of started getting into some of their videos, I was like this is, like I know about your roadcaster thing because I you've...

...talked to me about it. But like even when I started watching the video and that, I was like, yeah, this is I'm way out of my depth here. And so they're definitely which is fine, like it's absolutely fine, but I think it's important to kind of really recognize that they have. They are positioning themselves to a market that has some idea. They're not just people going into Jab Hifi looking for the the cheapest thing. They're really saying you know where for you when you know you need that, you know we know you need quality and you know at an add an affordable price, which is great, but we're not going to be here to kind of necessarily, you know, be that complete, complete, basic level. We're not their feet for those people, because it's they're not. They're just not using even the language around that. In my opinion, like you do need to have some idea of what you're talking about, yeah, which is embraces. I think it's bit of a shame, I guess, in terms of a missed opportunity that might not be pushed enough, is that they've got, like in the last two years I've released a Heber products that are very entry level microphones and experiences to make something. But I guess you know, if you go down the line of saying, okay, I want to start a podcast, how do I go about doing this? And you watch some you tubers or whatever, you look at some courses, yeah, they're going to kind of point in the right direction. So you get familiar with a bit of the vernacular are terminology of absolutely things are but off the shelf. I completely understand and I think this is why they're primarily positioning themselves with those people that do know what is kind of going on, because they they say, at least their marketing manager had said it this in a few years ago, just saying that their success is mainly based on the choice of people that they employ to make the products, that there for creatives, because when the people that they employ are creatives themselves, they're out, you know, on the weekends, shooting stuff, doing gigs, you know, using the microphones for that kind of stuff. It's very easy for them to relate to their customer base and talk to them on their level, which I think is what you were going to talk about, about specs or benefits and things like that. They are a brand that does rely heavily on the specifications rather than those key benefits to what they offer. Yeah, yeah, absolutely, and I think I think that that's, you know, that's what's become quite clear to me coming into it and and understanding, you know, how they're sort of positioning themselves and and marketing. But I would be interesting to kind of know that when they started, how what were the because you probably know this. What were the first products? You know, he'd started with that one mic. who were they kind of targeting at that point, I suppose, because, you know, we're looking at them now. How many wouldn't how many years to be say, if I'm many, used to say sixty. So, yeah, fort nearly for fifty five years it sorry, so we're looking at them like fifty five years on and to who they're kind of targeting now. But to be interesting to know, you know, in a small business capacity, who they were really kind of positioning themselves too. And I imagine, being that they were Australian made with that real high highcraft quality manufacturing, that wouldn't have necessarily been a scene everywhere. It would have been again, quite a niche market in that and it would have been predominantly professionals, right. Because, yeah, definitely, because no one else was using them, as no people are making content back then. Yeah, exactly. So well, in terms of their inception, this is what kind of gets into their messaging a little bit, because this is where the name comes from. Another nice segue chose, just like some, I don't know, I don't like a whush sound, is that their first product was called the Ntone, the Road Mt One, and that was that's still around. You can still buy them. They've iterated it since then, obviously, because it was a product that's been out sinside the S S now. So it's a it's a studio singing voice microphone that you use for that kind of production. You could use it for podcasting, I guess, if you want. It's just a really decent, decent microphone that should last the test of time and I daresay it's one of their products that has a lifetime warranty. But in terms of when they named that product, they I mean they needed a name it anything. They really had one to begin with at the start there. But they were selling so well, both here in Australian I think over in La as well. They were taking it to recording studios and things like that and they're, you know, going off the shelves like crazy. And there's this Australian kind of saying of like a rat up a drain pipe, of in terms of something happening really fast and going out the door and done really quickly. And so sales were going through the roof and that's whole idea of this. Right up the drain pipe. Is Why it was nicknamed the rodent was. It just, you know, sold like hot cakes, and so they took that name of road and and made road and t one separate and roll out and put the name as road. So Peter Freeman, the son of Henry who, you...

...know, started road himself once Henry had passed away in late s took that and ran with it. And they've got some Norwegian, Norwegian or Nordic background, one some sort of mordic background. Yeah, and that's why I put the accented. Oh I don't know how what you call that kind of Oh, but it's an interesting way. Like I spoke to her friend of mine about road once and she's from Norway and the Navy and litteral e. think Navan kind of let it. Yeah, yeah, and she was like, I don't why do they have like a Scandinavian kind of Oh in there? Yeah, the letter is supposed to like Oh, like when you say learned, it's like that, that oo sound at the front of it. Yeah, yeah, mouth there, and so it should say like rude. But it's called road, road, first rely. Yeah, well, it's just that's called us as slashed. Oh, I believe that. Well, that's what they are English. Yeah, that's what we call it in English. But yet so you can imagine. It's like that. You'll see the logo on our post. Yeah, there, yeah, but yeah, so they did that as a bit of a hallmark to their heritage of when they did live over in Scandinavia. Their current reform was Danish, Denmark. My W did in Denmark or Norway, can't remember off the top of my head, but that was they immigrated back to here, immigrant to Australia, because Henry Freeban was originally an Englishman. He married a Scandinavian Lady. I don't know what herd it was, thought astraid. There we go. Yeah, and the long story long. That's how road came to be. Yeah, I love that bit about it being from the rodent because I think that's super clever and I think so. Yeah, I think. You know, I often wonder whether some of those stories are revert they not that one, because I feel like that's quite accurate. or it could a barely conjecture about it, though, like some people, I say, the marketing man just said, depending on what story you believe the war in, he's like the one I most aligned with is this one. It could be totally different, who knows? But well, and even like Mary, like you know that the Oh yeah, and then create like having a nordic kind of not a Nordic gap, you know, sweet as Scandinavian like heritage like you kind of like did they just someone just do what like that and think that look cool at let's reverse engineers and meaning into this, into this name. But well, there's probably something even in the name. They're just like quickly. There might be some people been thrown off thinking that it's a Scandinavian brand, but actually it's Australian. They didn't realize. It's like so, yes, is that? Is that? I look like that? Well, that's it. And also then was that. You know, there's another I didn't know if you know this. This is a side note, but we like to Banter hargened USS The ice cream so recently I learned about that one. So that I think it's just I think it's an American brand. Yeah, but they created the whole look of it to appear to be Swedish or you know, is yeah, I think it's Swedish because they wanted it to like the hargends doesn't even mean anything if they just wanted it to sound and look Swedish, because they thought about that had a better like relationship to ice cream people like rustle, as opposed to being an American icecreams. It was all just in the brand like identity and nothing to actually, you know, there's no heritage there anything like that. So made a book brook in New York, like so it's really it's really funny how you can kind of create a different almost story from the visual sense without even knowing anything. And and yeah, absolutely, if you were familiar that that slashed Oh was a, you know, was a Scandinavian letter, then you might be very quickly like led to believe that it's a Scandinavian product, which also probably wouldn't intere the tram from it. No, it's doesn't make you. You still feel that would be of high quality. So interesting. I guess we only know what we've been able to learn about, but it's a it's a funny one to kind of think about where they got the name from. So as I think, yeah, and I think when we come back to that messaging, it's as we spoke about at the beginning, they don't have a lot of verbal messaging and I think, I think if we talk about that, like and when we talk about messaging, if you've been listening to us for a while, you'll know what we're meaning by that is sort of maybe they've got taglines or they've got like a positioning statement that they kind of live by, or they're, you know, in really like connected their values to the messaging that they putting out through their copy. So, you know, when we talked about go to recently, go to skincare, they're messaging and their copy was the hero of what they were doing, whereas for road. You know, I feel like what the almost the way their messaging is coming through is through their photography. So they're very there and the quality of that. So they're very much in this sort of yes, their visual messaging is sort of, I guess, more strong...

...than their verbal messaging, and so they've got this real, like super high production quality sense when you look at their photographs and so you you feel very quickly like this is not for an amateur. You'd feel like I'm going to be like I'm going to make good stuff, like I'm going to be up there with the best of the best if I buy this product. So they're kind of creating and like that visual messaging there, I think, as opposed to really focusing on like a language as such. Yeah, and for them like there, I think, kind of real words I could find about them, apart from some other kind of bits and pieces. The purpose wise they're marketing. Person said that road was founded on the premise of making quality audio tools accessible to everyone. I think is a nice kind of it's not explicitly so that's their purpose. It's just something that they work towards in their bit of a mission. Yep, but I think that's a good purpose for that kind of business. That makes sense. One thing I did find, just as you mentioned, the photography, especially on something like their instagram page. There's a yet of really great photography on there, but it's heroing photography from creators. A lot of it's not their own photography. Yeah, right, credit other people and one of the photos on there is even mine, which is fun, which was a competition. But it's a high level to show that they are a high level premium kind of brand. But still that's exactly it. They yet it's interesting with the affordability, because it's one of those things like I bet you at the beginning that was relevant to you, but I bet once you bought the product and it was so great. Yeah, like the affordability becoming less important as you went on. And I feel like with professional with that professional market, you know, like anything like you know, we don't need to buy an apple computer. We could buy, was it the true another brand? There's always a cheaper option, but it's the fact that we believe that they do the best thing for the work that we're doing and, you know, we align with them what we you know, we like that. Well, we're actually probably brought into all of the other stuff. So that's why we have to keep buying it. But yeah, I feel like with the road that's the affordability component. Like they don't really even when you look at their website, the size is a not no, no, so it's not trying to aim to be if that's definitely not in their messaging. Like I don't feel like that at all. As a as an outsider, I'm if I was looking to buy their product, I imagine I'm paying a premium because it looks so high quality and pre yeah, yeah, it's a premium product. That is so I feel like that's already very clear. Don't get me wrong, that the broadcast thing I got in front of me that that's eight hundred dollars worth or yeah, and what price you get at the time. But average prices general about an eight hundred. So it's not that accessible, but it's still something that's easy to use and function easy. But for the only real key message I could find, it was very kind of relevant to the brand that they present themselves as is on their instagram page it says the choice of today's creative generation. I think that's kind of very, very appropriate, especially the creators that I see on some places like youtube using this kind of gear. They're all using road mics in terms of their on camera microphone and even lave alier microphones that are attached to their lapel, that kind of thing. So yeah, it does sit appropriately with that and I think they've taken even the words of their consumers and they use them and that experience, obviously in the photo side of things, but from a messaging point of view, I think they've embraced that to put it onto their own merchandise and you see some of their shirt saying love my road. Yeah, you know, love. I think this is the thing where some brands, there are some brands are you go, yeah, I love their products, whether it that's the same kind of love that you have, obviously, for a person, but you know, to have that kind of emotional connection with a brand because they've helped you do something, especially in the creative aspect of things, you know you have an attachment to that to say, yeah, they didn't let me down, kind of thing. It's like a photographer going I love this camera, this makes my photography, you know, and my Ife for photography. Seeing it's kind of sentiments that create those connections, I think, is it really impactful part of what a brand then can become as a result of that experience and then to tap into it and use it as at a crux, but something to really used for advocacy, especially, I think, saying, okay, you got some person that's wanting to start up here in this space of maybe being a wedding photographer or, sorry, wedding videographer, and it's like, okay, what gear do I need? Okay, we got can, we got your Lens, and it's like, okay, what about audio equipment? Well, there's this brand is it's pretty this bad. What I do, rect man is road because this Guy Watch on YouTube. He used road microphones. Yeah, really cool, he in the stuff he did was really great. Yeah, and I think that's it. It's that's some what's interesting about, you know, creating that stardom...

...with a brand. It's it does. It definitely doesn't happen overnight like did. That is an absolute long term game of building a brand. And so any small business listening who wants to be famous within their market and that, you know, that's a word that we kind of can use around with brand, is that you know you you can certainly obtain fame within your market place if that's what you know, what your goals are. Yes, that's what you desire, and road is an example of that. Here. Is that they you know, to sell merchandise and actually, you know, you've got a hat, for instance, that you wear with pride on things. Is kind of again this signaling of I'm you know, I know about this product and I I you know, I know the value of it. And it's the same as that, as we've said before, with like Apple, for instance, and heaps of other heaps of other tech products particularly, but where there's this nice thing of going I've afforded this, I've I've got this and I know about the quality and and I'm really quite proud to be connected to it. And so, you know, for a brand to kind of create that stardom, that's a really, you know, a big win for their in because people are then will essentially willing to promote them. So seth good and kind of talks about these people as being sneezes. So it's the it's influencing the people who, you know, will spread the word. And so within the like the vlogging or the that sort of already podcasting space, for instance, if you get a few people who are really like into your product, they are going to sneeze about it to everybody, and so then it just spreads perfectly well for you as a brand. And so I think when we, you know, in hurt for helping other businesses who are listening to this understand that it's like, well, how do I who are the people who I can really in influence, but in a good way, so that they will buy just by default spread what I'm doing or spread what we're doing as a business? And that's I think that's the key in in growing your business is being able to find those sneezes, you know, really nurture those relationships and and and it's not even it's not about convincing them, because obviously road products are really good, but you have all those other things that play into the feeling of it being good and being connected to like a grouper special community, all of those things which, even subconsciously, might happen that then make them go. I'm going to keep telling other people about this. And and obviously, when you're in the industry of in the Youtube Industry, it's a perfect place because that stuff just that's the place to go to find out what to use. So it's a I think that's got a really yeah. So, yeah, it got a bit off the messaging there, but also that that idea of it it definitely being for creative people like or create creators. I think that's really greasing, creating the message. I think that's absolutely framing it. Yes, yea, yeah, no, definitely, so. So, yeah, they're kind of, you know, if we lead into then there, I guess, all their visual elements, which we sort of touched on with their photography already. It's interesting and we've spoken about their logo. It's interesting to kind of, I think, see again how they are just really upping that premium product in their look and feel like they've really they use a black, white and a gold color, which is interesting for I mean, I'm keen to hear your opinion on this because we spoke about this recently with something you are doing with using gold. So I kind of wanted to talk to you about what you thought about that because definitely to me that already just speaks. You know, that's just saying we are premium. Yeah, I didn't even realize this until the last year or two. Maybe that on every one of their products there's this gold circle below, or not even below the logo, which they do have as part of their logos. This Gold Hue, I'm circle beneath road or road mic phones. Now they present, and you'll see that again on page, but on the the on the their products, as a gold like inlay somewhere at least on all their microphones or the gear. And it's not just like the color, it's like a plated looking gold bit of metal. Something got chromed up in a bit of gold. I think even just that in itself is not just only a hallmark to the brand, but it gold, you know, premium. That kind of connotation that can be associated with that level of product is a clever choice. I guess sometimes it can be a bit tacky. I think anything about this is overtly, you know, luxury, because it's just that one little tiny thing. Like I'm looking at a pod, the pod mark that I'm talking into here. There's no logo. Mean there's logo at the back that I can't see, but on the side of it where you just the KNOBS,...

...there's the little gold circle and my the mics have that there and I never really know. Noticed that that was the thing that interesting. So it's kind of this little those extra things that you kind of learn about as you start using the postinctive assets. Yeah, yeah, you know them to be black and white, sure, I mean most of their products are black anyway. Some of them are have some white touches to it as well. They do use red and some of their products, but that's with the partner brand that they work with called Rycho or Ricka, who just make these. It's just a steady the microphone, so it doesn't create any kind of impact sounds through the mic Uh Huh. But yeah, it's a partner brand with with them, and that's, you know, a real kind of vibrant red that you standing quite a bit. But it's a shame it's not owned by them as well, but that's okay. Yeah, I think that. I mean I just think that that when you first come, when you first see the products on the website, we first come to the website, sorry, you do get straight away that feeling of with the photography, the mix of photography, the gold, black and white, you know, very kind of the Sand Serif type which they've used Abania. You know, you have this feeling of this as a, you know, highcraft Tech Brand? Yes, so I don't. You don't feel like it's Jb Hi fi level, you know, run off the meal staff, exhale sor yeah, absolutely, and and you don't get any of those feelings. You feel like it's quite high quality, what very high quality when you get there. So so they're they're again. They're doing that sort of signaling around their identity, that is, we're not cheap and nasty. You know, this is a premium product, and so when you kind of said before about luxury, and definitely there's you know, you can win and lose with gold. It depends on where it's used. But I don't think in this situation it's it's it's I don't feel like it's moved into attack he zone. Do you think that? No, not at all. I mean I have this struggle with brands that I work with about, I mean an Arang, but how do you integrate gold in a way that makes sense? You have done it before with an account as right, a mortgage broker of all things. Yes, that's right, and that wasn't to make a tack. It was to tap into another concept, which was being a rock star and that kind of volume. And then I really had that with or nearly had that problem, that conjecture about does this work for a greeting card company that uses gold, but it's more like if you can use the gold as an accent in a physical sense, I think that comes across a lot better potentially then what it does, which is digitally, which is like what you're saying there, with the you know, on the actual physical mic. Yeah, like seeing it, I marries it back exactly like I had this with my cousin that runs a Mexican restaurant. He's like, yeah, I really want to use gold and everything like that. I was like, well, why don't you use like that or brass in terms of your shop front? Like it's the esthetic appearance of how you present yourself rather than the look of how you present yourself online, and maybe use a Patina color more so, like a teal kind of Patina. Yea visual sort of things, so it doesn't seem as golden luxury tag for a Mexican, which doesn't feel like the vibe fits, but if you see it in store it makes a little bit absolutely yeah. So that's that kind of in person relationship to colors and touch and feel and you know all of those things. Those it's see other senses can work when we think about an inperson experience as opposed to a digital experience which, you know, has the potential to be flat and not necessarily have, you know all of that dine, you know that shine and tact wholeness that are you know, an in person experience can have. So yeah, that's really interesting. I think that one of my and only if we're going to have some critique, is that I feel like the overall look and feel of their website and their branding kind of doesn't really have any connection to their logo and so like, for me it's their logos quite heavy and bold and it's a what we call like a well, it's not even, it's not even anything, but it feels like it's. Well, it leads back to like the so, not to get true technical, but av an ear, for instance, which is the typeface that they use on their website, which you can see when you go to their website, which is a full sand Seraph, which means when you look at it, you or you don't really feel like there's any thick and thin lines. Everything feels very balanced and mono. Overall, it's a it's a nice readable typeface, it's very tech friendly, all of those sorts of things, whereas the when you look at the road logo type, you can see that there are...

...thin areas of the letters and thicker areas of the letters which are to do with the essentially a history of where the strokes were. So an old style typeface, which was like one of the first typefaces use this quite these these thicken thins, but they were close, like the thicken things were close to each other the weight. So there was difference, but it wasn't a huge it wasn't very obvious, whereas as we kind of went through time we got these really kind of when you look at the Vogue Typeface, for instance, of the magazine Vogue, it's got very severe thickened thins. So it's an obvious contrast. So I feel like the road like logo type, which is got these sort of you know, thick and thin marks in there, hasn't really translated anywhere else. So you know, I feel like if I was using doing that design, would I accentuate maybe some of the thicken thins on the logo type to make it more quote. You know, when you look at their the titles or some of their products, they kind of contrast this thicken sin of the Avenea Yep typeface, but they kind of haven't done that at all in the logo type and so I feel like there's a bit of a disconnect there because it doesn't come that that sort of typeface doesn't appear anywhere else, but it obviously has some history, right. So yeah, yeah, and they like this idea of using that cross Oh and they you know, maintained that throughout the slash Doh, sorry, throughout some of their other you know, title and yeah, I definitely agree with you there. I think if, for if they if they ever rebranded, I guess if an agency came along and said we're going to make a road typeface, like a road font, that it'll be used that is akin to what the road logos word Mark Is. Yeah, and make absolute sense. It would tie things together quite well. Having look at their site just there's a competition which we'll talk about the next part, but it's called with my road reel and it looks very off brand, stuper like disco and yeah, it's quite vibrating. Neet neon lights and all the rest of it, and that's a competition that's grown over the last few years. But it's not doesn't feel as on brands that other things that go with it. And they're moving into this space of multicolors, multicolors with some of their products, especially the podcasting stuff, but even their new wireless go to level, the kind of microphones they're introducing, these vibrant colors of orange and purpose like a Magenta, so it's like an orange, Magenta, green and like a Cyan blue, and that's used on the road caster, it's used on these some accessories for their podcasts, other kind of little podcast mics and to USB ones and there, as I said that before, the microphones. But that might be translating into maybe a shift in how they're going to brand themselves in the future. Maybe. HMM. Well, it could be a rebrand in the works that we're totally unaware of, like some other breaths. Find out about it. Yeah, talked to one one of the brands are already covered here, was got. He's going through a rebrand at the moment. Can't say which, but it was interesting to find out after the fact that they said you're actually don't rebet. Okay, yeah, it's so funny. Yeah, no, I think it's I think that there's yeah, those colors. It's interesting because then you kind of look at these kind of campaign the brands for the campaign's as opposed to just the brand. And so you know for that competition for instance, that its own campaign and then you kind of sometimes can see how brands make those steps to potentially refreshing their brand and and I think when we look at kind of how I can I can see what road is trying to do and I you know, there's a lot of similarities to kind of apple, especially with those backgrounds and stuff of what you get on Apple. You know, I can see a lot of similarities there. But you wonder whether they start doing a campaign and then go actually, yeah, this is the step now that we need to overhaul everything or refresh everything, and then, you know, that kind of flows on. So I don't think ever businesses, even when they're really, you know, got great brand strategy and or all these things, necessarily you know, things can happen that make them change direction or pivot in certain areas of their business because of maybe a great like like the just do it Nike. Yeah, tagline. You know, that was a slogan. Break Candy in the body came Nike. Nike, I'm sorry, nicely God, people say no, same as Porscher and Porsche. I get that one more anyway. So the one no. Way. Both my were to Mollie. You'll say, Maui just mow it way. Yeah, yeah, yeah,...

...see, body, hard things to say. Anyway. Just did experience. Yeah, yeah, I mean from, let's put it this way, from a business standpoint. If they did change the visual identity and it did go colorful, I think that would be a clear indicator to say that in terms of how their business has been revenue wise or profit wise, it shows that it's leaning more towards a consumer base rather than the proseumable professionals. They started having a shift away. It's kind of like what apple did with their colors, you know, with their colors of their imax when they first came out. They did the big colorful things. It showed that they were now pivoting to be a more broader, accessible consumer base product and moving away from the prosumer part which they come back time and time again to. We also are still for pros we are still for prose, but everything else indicates away from it kind of thing. Yeah, that's interesting as well. But that you think that, because I almost feel like it's still quite high end, like that real colorful, you know that look and feel the roads got going on. MMM, your it's not saying it's me, it's not saying it's charlish or anything like that. No, it's just it's just saying it's a little bit more creative for everyday creatives that you know, it has some vibrant color and gets that energy across of individuals, especially taking on board their products to make something of it, rather than people that are doing full production work with the ten of people that have to use this stuff. So there's guy that's Ober in the audio, there's a guys doing the video, there's going to doing the lighting or whatever it. It would be interesting that if they did rebrand and they did lean into the colors, that I think to me probably indicated their more consumer focused. They want to shift away from being just so solely. Yeah, yeah, and then they bring so they bring some messaging into towards that and make it a brand that you're buying into for that experience more than just individual products and specs and those kind of things. That would be cool way to go about road in the future, which I think is what blue and Logitec do. Yeah, quite a fair bit. And maybe that's a thing, like maybe they don't want to go towards that end of things. And I mean I think, yeah, I agree, I think there's you know, you'd want to they'd want to be really careful because they do have that fan base and I think if you were to kind of if that, often that fandom comes from people feeling that they're part of a unique group and so which, in this sense is like people who have got a better idea in a producing high quality content. Right. So there's this professional you know, I if I have road, I'm I've up to my game, I'm on the professional level, and so if they start to downplay that too too much of a like everyday consumer, I think they're going to potentially piss people off because there's going to be all these fan two are like well, we've stood by you, like we've been with you and we love you and we you know, where your staff and now I'm just the same as everybody else, like. So I think that that's a you know, from a brand perspective, it's a really important thing to really nurture that audience that you, you know, do have that fandomys with. I mean, that's Sim that's that plays into segmentation. So if you did have different segments in a market that are buying, I mean sales figures are going to tell you which one's the majority pretty clearly. It's where how you cater to those, especially if one starts hearing more than the other, especially if a newer market rather than a more traditional one for your brand, of how you give it that and you still honor the people that made your brand what it is now today. Yeah, consolutely curve. It's a delicate balance, I think, but totally and I think I think that's you know, there's still always going to be that aspiration and I think that sort of brand like road has already you know how you're going to grow as a brand like roads. That's how you can ye like realistic, but even for their consumers, like, if you're buying into that brand, you're aspiring to be really good. True, like that's I feel like that's that they've already created that connection. That and if you're watching your youtube and the person you're like, you know, your that guy you said before, who are Casey? CASEYIS that? Yep? Yeah, you know, like if he is using something, a road product, and you're like, well, I want to be like him. Yes, amazing, so I'm going to buy that product. So so there's still always that aspiration of wanting to be really good if you do buy into it. So even if they do meet that like, you know, consumer market, like that lower and consumer mark, if that's what they want to do, I think they're still going to maintain that aspiration through, you know, especially through their visual, visual media, and which is which, as we said before, is like, you know, really high quality. And once you start to look at the difference between, you know, professional high quality photography and stuff taken on your iphone, you can just see so quickly...

...how it just ups. I mean not that you would imagine road would have take on the I face, but you know even, as you said, when they sharing people's content, yeah, it's really high quality, like it's it is professional photography standards. And so again they're just reinforcing this is, this is, when you buy this, you are going to be this good. And I think that's there and things are on message at their feeding back. Well, you're at least aiming to be that good, right. So we gear and no idea. That's kind of thing which brings up as a kind of little bit of an idea which brings us, a guest, to the experience side of things, and we touched on this and we've kind of a kinder a little bit here to apple in terms of their packaging. My unboxing experience is pretty similar to apple through white clean. You know, Nice packaging. You know it has either extended or or lengthy leaven lifetime warranties on their products. Are some a ten year warranties, some a lifetime warranties. I think that's great. After market service and even the support online that I touched on earlier in the episode that you know you do, can't you do have the opportunity to go on there for tech support or even the community support of how to do this, because there's this endless videos about road products, of how to use them or how they work or that either road make them cells or other creators make about them, because you know they're in heavily into the influencer market of sending their gear to people that love this kind of stuff and talk about this stuff, for them to demo and talk to their audiences about it and really create some buzz about their products like that. When the roadcaster pro came out, I was watching probably about ten different people talk about the same product that was sent these these things to talk about, and the same thing happens with cameras. You know, iphone, apple products, samsime products, all the rest of it. This is a real thing now, but that kind of a guess speaks to their website is there as a resource, I think, and showing what the specs are and how to use it, where you can download certain bits of software from that support these products and they don't sell to a consumer, which, whether or not that's to their detriment or not, probably isn't based on the success of how they're going so far. But that experience of getting involved in the brand's and I think in a few ways. One is that you're seeing others use the product and engaging in that way and going look at especially on Youtube, a lot of creators will put the gear that they use to make their content in the description of their shows, which is really helpful, so you can find it. Otherwise they get people asking them all the time exactly exactly and that for them is an affiliate link and can get them some yeah, money, commission or whatever. But in terms of other aspects is, you know, social content. If you really are into photography and that kind of thing and you do like flat lay or your desk shots with in a some neon kind of little lgb lights or whatever, they froth on that stuff and they'll share it and everyone else in the community froths on it and I think I'm not just say this is a sexy thing, but it teems to be. Seems to be a lot of their audience is maleskewing in terms of the content that I see, in terms of interaction engagement, whether that's something that it's just you know, guys are really tech really in detectives, techlog as, it could be those whatever, but demographic, demographic kind of level of people, and they're all around the world, and not just Australians either. The people from everywhere around the world and you know, their product experience. Some of the bits I'm really well impressed by, like there was one microphone that I got given as is part of a competition and it comes in a leather zip, kind of like a pencil case type of thing, but made and everything to really just to keep your microphone well kept, and I was like that's that's really nice touch. And they still do that little sil with them. And not for everything, but some of the their items are a little more traditionally package with plastic and cardboard and that's kind of the experience. But for me, how you interact and use it is very straightforward. Yep. So yeah, it's not too hard them in the broadcast a deck that I bought. If you're going to be buying something like this, you kind of need to know a little bit about what you're doing. But even so it's pretty straightforward and how they're using it is listening to use a feedback and iterating on these things and things better. So, like, we'll see. It's interesting that you say that because I, you know, I, as I said earlier on, I started to because they have got a lot of really good videos and I think that where they talk you through the products and they talk about all the specks and I think in this kind of mark when we often we talk about one of the benefits over the features, because often a person buys for the benefit to them not for the feature, the features that the product has. But in this sense, I actually I think that the features play a big part and people are interested genuinely in the features of the because it's a tech product, right. So, and they do have that level of understanding. And I I feel like you probably know way more than you give. Well,...

...you know a lot, but I think it was the give yourself credit for, because when I started watching that road caster youtube I within the first minute I had I was lost, like it wasn't, it wasn't. Yeah, it was. And Fair enough, I'm not in the market for one of the moment, so I was probably less in you know, inspired by what he was talking about, but I thought great production, you know, great informations, you're delivering it really well, but I do think you absolutely need a level of understanding before you go into that, or at least want to know more, because kind of use case already in mind. The yeah, we used for to Goa, I need now. Yeah, yeah, and it's so in that sense it's you know, it's definitely not for everyone and I will I just do want to ask you. So you said you had to buy it from a place. Did you order it from the shop, like you could order from a lot online, but did you go into a store to the first? First One, I might have bought online. I think I bought it online at a digital online like ECOMMERCE store. Yeah, and then the same again for this road caster and the microphone in the boom m that I've got. Yeah, that was done on an ECOMMERCET store, Australian as well, whereas I got a little microphone that I use my little Sony Camera. It's got a video micro yeah, and that I bought at a camera, camera house or camera whe where. It was. Yeah, shopping more because it's it's one of those mikes that can be sold in a store like that that goes well with other DS, Laura, mirrors, camera, okay. But yeah, everything else, I mean the other gear that I got given in a competition. So I got another roadcast, another microphone, I got a hip of other stands and hyper other microphones and it's overkill for what I need. So I end up selling us a few of it, a few bits of pieces, but all fabulous gear. In terms of other, you know, touch points. I guess they do have a merchandise store where you can, you know, wear the brand, like you mentioned before, the hat, like, I wear that hat quite a bit now and I was wearing it on the weekend, last weekend and my brother in law always need to be my brother in law if you just put a ring on it. This is that he remarked that he met, I think it possibly might have been Peter Freeman, or unless he was just a crazy person that was saying that he was the owner of road. But my brother in law proceeded to tell me that he met this guy that said he was, you know, creator of Road and interesting, and they just that spiked that conversation of just me wearing the hat. Yeah, I was like, okay, thank you, go ahead for about to talk about them. And they have podcast in the next episode. Yeah, that's so funny. Well, there you go. Yeah, so I think it's that that whole thing of like sort of when you know, you know as well, which is nice likely, and to kind of be it, you know, to be able to connect with people who are in there in the know, was a really nice kind of a you know about quality. Yeah, like I walked past it that they create that. I will pass a girl on the weekend as well and she had a shit was ivy park, and I think that's beyonce or beyond sure children right rand, I think. Forgive me if I'm wrong, but even that association of like that's what you're into, yeah, type of thing. And that's the same with like sporting teams, you know, wearing your sporting shore. That speaks volumes for you and it gives people this like sense of identity as well. So I think as a as a all of those things kind of like we talked about the beginning of that episode with you Aki Haircut being that refresh, you know, when you choose to wear a product and it's an active choice, you know, not just this is the only thing that's Quain, but you know I give you if you choose to wear that product with kind of a sense of pride. You know you are really saying, I'm I believe in this thing or I'm connected to this thing or this is something I value, and it's quite you know, it actually holds a lot of power. I think if you choose to wear particular brands on you and make that very obvious, you are really signaling to people like this is something that I value and I'm connected to and you know, I want you to know that I've got this on even that, if it's all on subconscious level, I think it's still quite interesting in in people's identity. So yeah, so I think we've three, I'm going to be free, last, distinctive asets here that really make yeah, and one is the the book. wrote a book about themselves. I think is really fun, fun terms of the name, the road trip, which is yet very clever, taking them back through time sort of things, a bit of a yeah, just to story of the inception of it and how it came to be and progress and things that that creates what you call a brand story here, and in terms of messaging, that's part of messaging. I think it's just encapsulate into a book. That would be nice to have. On their website. They do have a little bit about their history on there and there's a nice might be a painting possibility of their original store Yep, you're in...

Sydney, which I thought was quite nice. A Freeman Electronics. But yeah, that that tight side of things. If you can communicate your story and give a bit of an insight into the inception of it and how it's grown and you know how how it things have evolved. I think that's a good little insight to for a consumer to buy into it your brand that little bit more. That was interesting there. You can't even get them anymore. They're still sold out, it looks like on their site. That's the only thing they do sell direct to consumers, their merchandise and what. Yeah, and then they've got a guy on their youtube and their product videos called rhyan burke good. I'm Ryan from road and he's always the the kind of the face for the brand. And to have the connection with your consumers in that way that you've got a familiar face I think is a good distinctive asset to have so that you know that familiarity builds trust and what that person saying. So if you see that person over and over and over again, you still have some association with that brand and go okay, cool, this is what we're absolutely yeah, well, and we look we you know. I think that's so important because it sometimes it is hard to connect to a brand when you've got there's there is no face, and so one of those sorts of experiences where it's someone showing you and you can will Ryan said this like again. It makes it a lot easier for people to kind of to connect and to understand. And is he has he got a particular was here like a sound guy or I'm not sure. I think actually works for the road, like he's a employee. There's an employee? Yeah, no, cold. Actually I wondered because to me he's and no offense to you, run, because that you sound like a great guy, but when you're listening back to this, I he reminded me of someone who would work in a in a text or like he just had the full gamut of like he's really into tech, he loves the details, he loves talking about the products and and that's the he was actually quite typically that sort of person. So it was interesting because I wondered if he'd had like a history of, you know, he was a particular sound guy or had some industry connection, or whether it's yeah, maybe too sure the next story of Rhynberg. Yeah, Ran, I love the last one of distinct abusets. I think really taps into giving back to creators and making it a community brand. You know, on the face of it it's not really here throwing them as the brand, not being making big song and dance about who they are and what they do and all the rest of it's like make great products for creators to do what they do kind of best and to give back to them. They've done in a many different ways. They do competitions all the time, of one of which I won. But yes, they even did a promotion where if you bought one of them mics, you could buy another one for a dollar. I so wow is that. It was like a million dollar initiative to give back to creators, to really expand their gear. And the one that really stands out as their kind of hallmark way to engage their community is something called my road real. So it's one of the largest international filmmaking competitions. We talked about it before with their logo and everything. But yeah, it's a two hundred and fifty thousand dollar US prize and they've been doing this each year since two thousand and fourteen. So it's a real testament to them being able to you know, obviously it's sponsored and there's a big partners like adobe involved in this, but in terms of giving back, are lining with those exactly big plans as well. Exactly, and you know, it's giving that created an opportunity to use their products to make something and then be rewarded for it potentially as a result of it. They've then introduce that into the podcasting space. They do my roadcast now since two thousand and nineteen. That those both those competitions just finished recently. So they the entries for their my road real, I think finished last week. They would have been, you know, hundreds of people that are submitted videos for the rest of the community to vote on and then pick a win a kind of like chropfest essentially. Yeah, it's here in Australia and and make it something that's a global community building initiative. Yes, to go from there. If they had, I don't know if they have like a private community or anything like that, but if they did like that would be pretty awesome just to share those bits of information where you have a community forum type of thing, but you might set that up for them. I'll please. No, it's Tom Ross onto it. Yeah, that is a good idea though, because I think that they've definitely got that fan base. Yeah, they creating a community around that would be a really club on there. In there there's a lot of discourse about it on things like Reddit and another good forum places, but you know if there was one that they started the conversation and all the conversation for themselves would be really interesting way of monster in that community sense of what they have and do. But well, you know. Anyway. Yeah, no, that's very good and I think,...

I think when we usually wrap up the brand it's you know, we like to talk about what what we would do and I feel like we've touched another lot ready in this episode. Do you like the brand? Frank I wasn't clear. I'm pretty on the fence. I got to say now, of course use. I mean I use this stuff now every day, pretty much puff from the weekend. It's used every day for calls of clients on zoom calls, are even phone calls, even listening to music through my computer sometimes do that. I can record our podcast, obviously, and you do a lot of fun things with it, I guess, to all those sounds that you hear, well, the sounds from the road. Yeah, we do like. Yeah, he's about frank, boys central over here. So yeah, I recommend them. I do recommend them to other people. There are certain news cases, is use cases, where I'd say, yeah, I try one of these other different things that have road but look if you if it fits the need, it fits the price that you can afford. That, you know, by all means I reckon. I mean I want to buy some more things of this, to be perfect honest, but I just you know, I'm gonna be Frugal quite yet. Yeah, yeah, well, I'm the same. Look, I you know, at the moment I'm probably need to get a camera mic and that's something that I've I'm you know, I've spoken to you frank about how I want to fix up a bit of a setup that I've got. So absolutely, you know, net because I trust you and your opinion. This is the perfect example of, you know, social proof really, where if you told me this is the thing I should buy, then I'll probably just buy it. So, you know, the way that's that's how well that works and that's what we're talking about before the youtubers, is that, you know, if you know someone and you trust them and they've already got that interest and they suggest it, then that's probably enough for many people to make the next the next purchase. So so, yeah, I am. And you know, I didn't know there were Australian before we talked about doing it on this episode on the podcast, and so that for me is another really big tick for well, look, if I coul buy it between, you know, an Australian business and an overseas business, that I'd probably like to keep it in Australia. So if it's equally as good quality or whatever, than that's a big, big tick for me. So I've enjoyed, like all the episodes, really learning about, you know, what they're doing and rule different ideas. Yeah, yeah, okay. Well, that brings us to the end of today's wonderful episode eight. I believe we're up to episode A, series two. Yeah, and we am you know. That's branding banter for the week and, as always, if you'd like to connect with us at all, we'd love you to follow at branding banter on instagram and you can find both of our respective websites and social media accounts through that handle. And you can also check out the show notes on the podcast wherever you listen to the podcast, all those podcast you places, as we used to say, yes, yes, we love your feedback. As always, a review and apple podcast, because we know that the majority of you do listen by Apple podcast. I says every week. I should put it at the start of the episode, because I know you probably listen all the way to the end. Who knows? But again, any questions you want to say in any brands that you might like us to shine our branding banterist spotlight on, please? Actually, some one did tell me that. I didn't tell you that. Yes, now, who was it to talk about? Someone had said we should chat about Mamma Mia. So yeah, that was someone that had said that. So we might have to talk about you know, have a look at that. But yeah, it's interesting when people will say who they're interested in US chatting about. I think it's good feedback. I know that several people have heard and then thought about how they interact with those brands, you know, the ones we've already spoken about this season. But yeah, next week we are going to be chatting about shining the spotlight on pet barn. Yeah, so that's P good dogs and effects cats and things going on. Yeah, all of them all of a sudden look at. But one's an interesting brand because the the rebranded piry recently and they've got quite a interesting brand based on their products and their services of what they offer. But yeah, that's a bit of a teaser for for next episode. But yes, excellent. That's US for another week. I hope you enjoyed this episode. Thanks very much for listening to tuning in as always. Yeah, as always, and we'll see you in episode nine of season two. A brandy better boy. See you later.

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