Branding Banter
Branding Banter

Season 2, Episode 7 · 1 year ago

S2 EP7 - Australia Post

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

🎙 It’s time for some more banter!

In this episode, we’re getting deep into the pores to shine our banterous spotlight on our national postal service, Australia Post.

It is a heritage service provider with over 200 years of history. However, our focus in on the brand that is Australia Post which was conceived in 1975 and has remained relatively unchanged since then. But, the identity has seen a couple of refreshes in it’s time, the last most notably occurring in 2019.

So for us in this episode we’re mostly identifying Australia Post as a brand that is not only differentiated from others (being the only national postal service in the country), but that it is a very visually distinct brand that helps all Australians recognise and engage with their brand at all ages of brand experience.

🎙 Where to find more about Delphie & Frank

Branding Banter on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brandingbanter/

Delphie Website: https://www.seecreative.com.au/

Delphie Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/seecreativestudio/

Frank Website: https://www.gdayfrank.com/

Frank Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/gdayfrank/

Hey, frank, good Alfie, time to start the banter. Yeah, let's go branding banter. Gay You and welcome to branding banter, the podcast that shines a spotlight on Australian businesses for business owners, brand consultants and designers, so that we can identify how a brand helps a business connect with their consumers, while of course, having a bit of a back and forth between each other, a banter, as we call it, about a featured Ozzie brand each week. I'm your host, stealthy, and this is my cohost, frank, and before we'd begin, we just like to acknowledge the traditional owners of the land in which we are both recording the podcast on today. I'm on the beautiful coast or why Jack Country and frank is on the mountainous gun Dangara country. We pay our respects to the elders past, present and emerging as co hosts of branding banter, we individually run our own branding consultancies from two different sides of Australia. So frank runs get a franc from the blue mountains west of Sydney, while I run sea creative from Perth in Western Australia. And here we are what a Monday morning it is. It's beautiful and sunny here. How it has per perfect. Yeah, it is. Well, was. Yeah, it's pretty perfect, pretty Christy. It's. So I know I'm a little bit I'm just going to disclaimer. It's beautiful weather, but I'm a little bit on struggle straight this morning. We just spoke before that frank is kicking all these goals this morning and I'm here like being up since very, very early, but still just drinking my second coffee. So, yeah, I've been to Ikea, I've gone for a run of taking the kid to school. It's morning. That a lot going on. We good and I'm you know, I'm so proud of us. got into seven episodes, like seven weeks in a row. I'm gonna Smash this. WE'RE gonna get to ten and then we'll be just fall apart like every Christmas an now it's a really it's yeah, as we've said in the previous episodes, it's been each episode we've like taken away and learned something from which is really enjoyable. But I'm also just kind of proud of us as well for sticking with it because, you know, we are both have very extremely busy lives. So it's great to kind of be I was thinking about this this morning, just how a collectic we've made the choices of brands that we're talking about. MMM, yes, not sort of on the same playing fields at all or picking them for different reasons, which I think is good too. So, yeah, I think it's a it's been a really nice kind of broad spectrum today, particularly when we get into it. It's going to be interesting because it's a I guess, yeah, it's it's different again, which is what we've sort of been going on. But I think what's been really nice is that most of the brands we've been speaking about a quite relatable to everybody listening. Yeah, and especially in Australia, and so, you know, I've had I don't know about you, frank, but I've had conversations to different people over like Ah, I was listening to that and then it made me think about this that I dune or my interaction with this brand, and so I think that's really nice to kind of just be drawing awareness around how we are, you know, surrounded by brands and branding all the time, constantly, without even necessarily knowing, you know, what's going on behind the scenes. I got to say I saw the worst logo today on a side yeah, I thought it was for a children's like painting kind of like entertainment that would come to parties and stuff, and they oh, yeah, it was a guy that would did like professional painting for houses and things. I was like, Oh, why Lord, there was every color under the song. That's okay, fair enough, whatever we're doing. That's I've there's actually one that I keep now that it's actually for another painter, as well as interiously that you say that and they've dried a frame signs all around. So we're over, they're doing the painting and I keep wanting to stop and just say, Oh, it can I like, could we just improved a little bit? But it is. I count you through. Yeah, it's really we're really quite, you know, full on, and I do think that obviously there's that whole thing is in there of like getting at antion but also not being just a nice right, right, exactly, exactly. Well, let's get into today's episode without Abcute time. Os, BBC, the Hous you bring mad a quiz as always delpy as the question masters am today. Okay, frank, don't as of December. Two Thousand and twenty. How many same's were said to be trading in Australia? Was it a minimobile trace? I know we don't. You did that for me last week. It was like massively helpful. So, even though I got it wrong,...

...all okay, was it a two point three million? Was it be one point five million, or was IT CE seven Hundredzero? And now I'm being on the approximate. It's amaze in Australia, in Australia, let's go with two point three. MMM, wrong, but got to be. Now this is interesting. So yeah, well, I'll tell you why, because this is this was it was a little bit of a trick question because that two point three million number is thrown around heaps. A lot of the news reports are kind of talking about two point three million small businesses in Australia. But actually they've done this. Then it's called Ted erected to Ted a res data. It's a company and essentially they've run this data with a sick and all the other kind of organizations that store this information and there and also what is classified as a small business. So depending on the number and the number of Sames in Australia is six hundred and sixty six thousand three hundred and ninety three, and those that can classified to have a phone number, a premises, even if it's a home business, and at least one employee. So there's it's different between soul traders and small businesses. Or was a little thing salt traders. Yet no, ext's a bit distant, Sont like to me and Sim does include salt traders. But I think this is what I throw. It's interesting how they year, the how they judged, because you can have the well, there was it was a whole bunch of different data around it that kind of talked about what was how many soul traders there were, as well as then how many small businesses there were. So I mean I suppose you can be a contractor soul trader and work in a company kind of thing. So to be why there's a delineation of saying these. Yeah, yeah, like, for instance, I in my company, so I am a company, but I'm a I'm the only employee of Your Company. Yeah, whereas for you now your punish partnership. Yeah, so it depends on, I think, the legal and then that's what it was kind of saying. So it was interesting because they it was yeah, and I wasn't little question, but I thought it was worth kind of chatting about because it is interesting how we kind of hear these big numbers. But it is true there's a lot of small businesses in Australia. But what is considered, you know, sal trader, what is sued? Small Business, media business. So this week we are talking about Australia Post, of a hall of all brand. Yeah, it's very big one. It's a very long standing business, but not so much the brand itself in terms of it paying a service or a product. It's pretty much both, because they do have a national mail service and International for that to facilitating those bits and pieces come in and out of Australia. And I also sell products and products are sold typically in their stores, of which they have I think it's like four thousand stores around us Truli, which is an incredible amount. Yeah, YEP, huge amount. And so in terms of the brand that we're focusing on is Australia post as it is now called. It was something previously at the level of foundation of Australia kind of level. But in terms of the foundation of Australia posts it is now as a commercial entity. One thousand nine hundred and seventy five was established and then it's kind of named Australia Post, shortened from its bigger corporate name, in one thousand nine hundred and eighty nine. So you before I was born, actually after, sorry, after cheese you. Are you a D eighty eight springter idiate? You A UM centenary? Yes, cent Terry Bad. Yeah, yeah, that's yeah, with the January, if anyone wants to remember that. The prisoners close to my sister, I think my own sister as well. Three days apart, but the same year as my sister. Okay, not three days apart from your sister. That would be no, that would be really weird. Becuen twins a or adopted that? That could also. That would be even we different. I'm speaking of different to speaking of different differentiation really plays, I think, with it's very nice secure. Who Sort about that boom tissue? Actually, wait, do I yeah, got it. And I call out differentiation here because Australian post is one in its own in Australia it's not. There's nothing else exactly like it, because it's there's only one national mail service. Yeah, there are couriers obviously, and brands. It do similar things, but it's pretty differentiated. It's still a government owned body. So it was formerly known as the Australian Postal Corporation, as I alluded to before. It's a government business enterprise that...

...provides postal services in Australia. itself funded, but all it's dividends, which is interesting, goes back to Australian government. Yeah, that has its sole shareholder. So it's an interesting way that it's set up in that way. So it's like you're independent but you're not. Kind of thing. Yeah, and so there was a big hujar about the CEO of Trali Post giving out some fancy hoss roll x has to other executives and then getting four next car. Is that Cartier or hardy has? Cuddie? Yes, Sir Caddie, yeah, I'll get your brain right, Frank God, but I find this is standing in terms of some statistics. In Two thousand and twenty they processed two point eight billion items. Has it a guess? That would be over three now, just given the delays that we've got going on e commerce business, and they're delivering to twelve point three million delivery points, which would include houses, I would imagine, across Australia to one hundred and fourteen countries across the world. Yeah, huge numbers, pretty huge, huge number. So they're a ginormous enterprise for stree. Exact. Yeah, yeah, exactly, exactly. And they in two thousand and nineteen they sort of did a refresh of their brand. So that's sort of what we're going to be focusing on predominantly in the discussion today. So one of the really nice things about Australia post is that we're kind of looking at it as a heritage brand and so we're going to talk a bit about why that's important and what that kind of looks like carrying through that, you know, long history in Australia as well. So what we do every week when we talk about these do these sort of broad critiques of the businesses, to kind of look at what these brands do with in terms of their strategy and how they connect with their consumers and their community. We want to be more aware of what goes into the branding process and that will hopefully empower us to take away from some learnings from this to use for our own brands. Or to be, you know, more informed consumers or to design other brands around with this information at hands. So hopefully this all makes us better decision makers and when it comes to building our own brands as we as the brands we talk about are kicking goals for the most part. So today as the most part with this one, it's a really weird one. Australia Post, you love, I hate it, or just like your kind of in the me and I think there's a lot of tolerance. That's what I've sort of when I was doing like there's a lot of tolerance around it because we don't really have better solutions. Yeah, when you're not the alternatives, you kind of do, but it's not as acccessible now you don't really like there's and I think that's what we're going to talk about in here. You know, in our first sort of notes around target marketing and positioning is usually we sort of look at the competitors, right, and one of the big things is that really, besides some courier companies, there's just there's no one else that you just ship your letter with. You know, you might send a pass or with somebody else. You might use a courier to deliver certain things, and there's those alternatives. But your general what Australia Post covers, it's very you know, it's very hard to find anything that would match up to it. So the target market was here is pretty much everyone. One of those businesses that is everybody. It's kind of like a supermar yeah. Yeah, well, because they're so they're exactly they're basically a monopoly in that in the postal yeah, which makes sense that it's a government owned yeah, I think if it wasn't, then you'd probably see skyrocketing pricing of stamps and yeah, that's very true. Yes, yeah, I guess that regulation does help in that respect. But yeah, it's the only national postal service here and I think most countries are operate the same way. I don't know off the top of my head of any that I've heard of that have a duopoly or more yeah, in terms of what they have as a postal service. But I think just in this rise of coreers, especially the pickup and send to somewhere so that someone can pick it up from your premises and take it on. Yes, there's services like Sendel, which is probably a similar kind of thing, where you can go. It's really cheap. It's like four dollars to send something. But even still, if you wanted to just send a letter, that's still like a dollar something. So and some of the time frame. So I've actually when I was over a sendal was a reasonably functional, you know option to use. But now, being over here on the west side of the country, it things being posted by Sendal a taking like four weeks, where Australia Post are getting them in, you know, six days. Okay. So it's actually its substantial difference in time depending on where you are, and so I do think that it a it's, you know, that's made a big like I've now gone back to using Australia post a lot more because of the fact that that some of the time frames are just ridiculous. So, I mean we're already expecting delays because of, you know, the covid but yeah, that's what we...

...had experience. Like, my wife uses Australia Post quite a bit for, yeah, jewelry business, and we try to send something just to Queensland, for so north from New South Wales. Yeah, and that took three weeks and that was express post. Oh really, I don't know. What happened in maybe be easeally got stuck somewhere that it were like, why did that? is a really long yeah, I feel like something went wrong. That's unfortunately, but yeah, okay. So in terms of yeah, in terms of the as we said, the Korea services, there's like Sandal, there's DHL, Fedex, TNT express, and some of those actually I noticed do join for some partnerships. I think at one point, I think it was DHL, was actually partnering with Australia Post on some of their delivery so that they were, you know, able to fill in some of the gaps maybe for time friends or whatever. So yeah, but again, they're not. They're not for your everyday posting. Said Post. Sorry that DHL partner with James Bond because they're kind of like a spot spot. You see date, double O, seven logos on the side of the trucks at the moment because of the new movie. Oh and they're partnering with James Bond and Star Wars. I'm just not across from that's all right, sorry, see them drive up and down. So good. I'm of the Empire Records Time Frame. Well, and right here and Juliet there, my can you get involid with those anyway? All right, so many sidetracks have a little up. Yes, I do. There we go right down memory line. That's actually like quite reminiscent of Romeo and Juliet as well. Yeah, that gun shots. Okay, we are so so siddress today. Okay, UM, anyway. Yes, so, lots of everyone in Australia, I'm sure, has had some interaction with Australia Post, even down to children. It's like very you know, I'm especially being with things like postman pat the television show. You know, there's all these there's an excitement much like the garbage trucks, especially for my children to see the postman ride or the post person, which there was comes for them. Yeah, well, you want to put something in the mailbox, exactly. There's a lot of joy still around posting and receiving. So, you know, I think that, as we've said before, it's really you know, so many businesses and consumers have interaction with Australia post in one way or another. They some interesting things that I noted about in the researching was how much they kind of use their kind of corporate responsibility. I supposed to be involved in community and so they partner with beyond blue, which we've spoken about before. Yeah, I saw a ven run right in front of me, didn't run cut me off reading. Yeah, is it a roundabout? And it had be on blue in the back of it. I was like yeah, exactly. And they so they actually do like a free postcard thing. So beyond blue they actually pight so people again to kind of promote good mental health. They send out free postcards and doing a lot of support there. They also do support their children's Literacy Fund. I think it's there's a few different ones and another one for first nations authors as well. They they do. Yeah, they support a whole bunch of literacy, especially in remote and rural areas. So they kind of providing books, you know, to these community groups and they are another thing that I thought was really interesting is how they're using their communication networks and they're kind of I guess I want to say quick response, but to provide quick responses to crisis and disaster events that happen within Australia. So that's one of the things that they kind of a really big on supporting the community through. So I feel like, you know, there's some besides just doing, you know, your interaction with posts. They're actually playing a big part in, you know, in community, considering how many how many communities they're in, if that makes sense. So yeah, I mean that's really one of the things is you're known for something and it's, you know, sitting a letter or packaging or whatever it is, shipping. But then you have, as you said, a corporate responsibility to add the brand, add to the whole experience of what we do and what we do to give back and make it a more purposeful yeah, ran, rather than just a business that's there to give evidence to the government. And I think even, as you know, as small, small and microbe businesses, you know, even done to you sole traders. There's you don't have to be doing anything on this sort of scale, obviously, but I think that even, you know, every single person could have some part of their business that they you know, that they have a belief in, that they're sort of, you know, giving something back to to community or to their customers or or something that they're actually able to you know,...

...have something with slightly more purpose to it. So we've spoken of that purpose before in a lot of you know, a lot of contexts, but I think in regard to like how Australia posted doing all of these things, even for a small business kind of listening to this going, will you know what I do? Donate five percent of my profits, you know, to this for this particular thing, or, you know, I'm going to do some volunteering on behalf of the business because this is something I believe in. I think that it does just give a nice, you know, a nice balance to kind of trying to earn money as well you're also being able to give something back and be part of your community. solutely. Absolutely, if you can't do it as an individual, if you do it as a company, of Minster, it is a company expense that you can get. Well, the goal of it. No, but I mean any I think that's it. And of course it's not for you know, if you're already struggling to make ends and mate, then that's, yeah, the need, but I think that there's yeah, I think exactly, and I think that, you know, seeing bigger businesses doing this is really, you know, it's a really important part of them having that responsibility to the to the community who's supporting them for so long as well. Definitely, so I touched them afore saying was for around Fozero Post officers. You've got some details here for those, yea, three hundred, yeah, and that two hundred, two thousand five hundred of those are in rural and remote areas. So they are really, you know, dispersed across all of Australia, which is really incredible. One of the things that I did find was really interesting in the, you know, in the researching of it was, and I think I've noted this further down, but that actually honor it, is that the all the post office is, sorry to tracking my words right, the actual like in real life officers. Yep, run by franchise. So that's yeah, so they it's an interesting cause. I've I've gone in personal experience, which kind of led me to find in this out was I've gone into different ones and they're that I can't, we can't do that because we're not. There's I think there's what there's a like a licensed post office and then like a postal agent or something. So yeah, they're depending on what their title is, depends on what they can actually process, as some of them can't do passport photos but other ones can or something. So yeah, that was really interesting. Because there was a bit like when we did talk about bunnings and you know there was the bunnings but their bunnings warehouse, but then there was also just a bunning. Yeah. So the one thing, I don't know if this is true or not, and because I live in a mountainous area, it's thousand. Well, where we are about seven hundred meters above see. That also something alpsie. But yeah, I think in terms of where they measure the height of for each suburb is based on where the post office is. I don't know, I don't know if that's true or not. I don't know if that's just like a myth or something. I think my wife might have told me that. She's a she's well, they measure the center to an area. So before so you know when you have the town, the the town thing, that's measured to the center. That's where the post office is in the town. So when you have your green road signs and it says for thousand kilometers person, that's the birthday. You know, that's what that Perth Po box. Yeah, so the yeah, yeah, so that is yeah, but maybe the hype thing is something as well. But yes, definitely a kind of yeah, that's interesting. I didn't think about that. It's here. So I track in how in terms of the makeup of people that do work within the corporate entity that is Australia Post, even the contractors and agents post offices, there's a hundred forty seven nationalities, which is shows, especially in Australia, just how multicultural that we are as a nation. But to be representative, I think is good. The three percent of the workforces aboriginal or Torres Strait Islanders and five point seven percent have a disability, which I think it's great. Those percentages would be amazing to see a bit higher, but you know, well, Al Yeah, I think at least there's an active you know, they're actively trying to fill those roles and I think even down to some of I noticed that some of their you know, like I said, I don't know quite the correct term, but you know, where they're kind of putting all their boxes and stuff together, I noticed that they have like a high portion of dissent disabled people doing those jobs as well. So, yes, I was quite interesting to say and I think again it's I think did we say it was like eighty thousand employees? I think it. Yeah, I'm no, I did. Yes, you did, employing over Eightyzero people. Yeah, so it's massive. You know. That's that's a huge across Australia. That's a huge support. LGB tiq plus.

I got that right? I'm sorry if I don't. And they've achieved what they say is a gender pay parody. Yeah, which is good, for the last four years. So they're really ticking boxes, but really living up to corporate responsibility, which is a government and enter do you think? You definitely would need to, but could at least at the showing that and keeping the consistent. But yeah, there's this in terms of positioning with Australian posts. It's when it's your your one and only, your blue ocean kind of strategies, if you will, kind of like with when are BNB came along, it was like blue ever and other works there like the only thing they're. Now there's that's completely different than more like yeah, but I don't think there's ever going to. I've never say never, but yeah, in the short term at least, it's not going to be some competitor that comes along goes yeah, you know what we're going to we're going to be the EX Australian post? I don't know. It's also to do with infrastructure. I mean just they are hundred miles stem. That works across all the businesses who are, you know, put a lot of trust into them shipping their own customers products and you know, it's just huge. Like to try and compete with that in a country as small as Australia would be really difficult. I think. So, yes, and why you would do it? Okay, so she yeah, no, no, I was just going to say that interestingly because I was thinking about like things like star Trek and because I always get the things on my phone, you know, when parcels coming, and they actually you probably knew this, but they own stuff. Atre track now in out right and I believe it for a while it was fifty with Quantas. So Australia Post and Quantius and sort of bought star trekers like a joint thing, but then they bought the all of it. They bought quantiss fifty percent off them. So I believe that it's fully owned and that Star Trek came around and you could like track them with GPS. I thought that was amazing. H I want to know where my man is. Yeah, my driver. I driver. Yeah, when my parcel is probably five o'clock in the afternoon. I was supposed to come today. Where is it? I know it's that's one of the interesting things, isn't it, with that whole tracking system as well, and like how Australia post has changed their communications as well. Like now, I'm sure you're the same, but pretty much you always get updates on when your parcels coming, when it's going to be delivered. Can you change the address? Like, yeah, a lot of stuff which I think it's really helped to real yeah, and the help had pay people's confidence and what's happening. You know, I think that's one of those really great behavioral changes that's happened where they kind of removing that uncertainty that people have with deliveries. As opposed to just like waiting for it to turn up, you actually have some detail around when it's likely to be, which kind of settles people's anxiety a little bit. Absolutely absolutly. All right. Let's move into messaging. Yes, because there's a little bit of it. There's not, I think, an extensive amount of messaging with Australia Post. Yeah, they definitely don't really have a tagline or the thing saying. Well, not even that. You just sort of see it and you go oh, yeah, that's it's you know that, you're familiar with right. So, yeah, they it's really just Australia post is. So I think it. This is a brand. It's really vision, like a visual brand rather than a voice brand. MM, like go to be spoken about that last episode. That was a very message based brand, we felt, at least because it drew is. That's what drew us in, whereas, yes, Australia opposed what I've found. Even just today, going for a drive I reckon, I saw about ten different instances of seeing Australian post was a mailbox, of it was a truck, if it was a big, big glory truck, even the posted driving by and the little bikes, all these different things. I was like, I'm seeing this. It's kind of like that. I don't know what the law is, but it's that. Yeah, you see when you thinking, it's like when you want to why a pram or a new car, called confirmation bias. Okay, they get where. Yeah, it's where you precusip know something and then you keep a diversion of confirmation bias. I think. Yeah, yeah, remember when we would have pram, another Australian brand reads baby Shoulda. Oh, yes, yes, I see them, you see them everywhere, so you buy. That's it. It's I don't actually think it is confirmation by it. I think it's called it's got a like a name of the person. Yeah, anyway, it doesn't matter. But any is that thing where you are. Then you are so familiar because you just keep saying it everywhere. And I also I would kind of bring it back to the idea that because Australia process such a presence. We've talked about availability bias before and or just being available and having that mental absorbed, taking up that mental space for when I need to post something or when I need to do anything to do with mail. The thing that I think about is Australia Post, yes, because we've just was so familiar with it. And so I think in terms of messaging and less they were trying to really boost, like all, counter something that had maybe been...

...negative in their their business. That's when messaging might play a bigger part, but at the moment it's you know, it's not about attracting people to the business so much. It's more about maintaining, like you know, a really good service and trust exactly. Yet I found that I found the voute, the the psychological Oh yeah, what's thought? The Beta mind? Yes, I knew it was a name. Yeah, yeah, sometimes it's referred to as frequency illusion. There you go, those of you playing at home. Very cooling. Not so much it. Couldn't get it right. All right. So in terms of messaging, the purpose that I could find, in terms of especially in their rebrain, I think it might have been written there possible on the website to create connections and opportunities that matter to every Australian. Yeah, overwatchingly it's quite broad, but I think in terms of a more point point it's not the right one, but is at the right word, I'm sure. HMM, it will creates emotion and feeling. Yeah, we can see. Yeah, maybe, okay, the sorous, but it's there for every Australian. Obviously it's to have a connection from one point to the second point of where you're trying to send things. It makes sense. It's just it's a lot of these times with purpose it can be very fluffy because it's so broad ranging and not yes, especially you have so many different services, let's say in products. Absolutely, I mean, you know, I for me, that whole idea of connection is exactly what they're doing, because they're creating connections between all these different points, right physical sense of physical exactly ending just in their connected like you know, they're big on the connecting to community and how communities are connected and keeping things going, which is why I think those, you know, those partnerships that they're doing a really relevant to what they're about as well. So maintaining connections with people and people with each other and then, in like a first person kind of way, that they articulate that as we connect people with each other and the world, we help unlock opportunities for everybody, and that mighty. That might speak to their inclusivity. Yes, staff as well. Yeah, absolutely. Yeah, no, it's I think that they're definitely like living those values, I suppose, in that regard, through through what they're sort of demonstrating, or what we've at least seen that they're demonstrating. So and as a brand. But again, you know, having a brand that's so big is like, you know, you, I always think, how did they and we know that they have a brand. We're going to go into that and they be like their brand hub. But how do they make sure that the people who they're employing, for instance, or WHO's opening up a franchise, a a franchise? How do they know that they're going to follow through with, you know, those values? I always think about that. On these massive scale business, you know, corporations, how do they get consistency? Consistency here? Think I remember, I don't know if you've seen that movie the founder, about the story of McDonald's founder, Ray CROC. Happened and when they opened up franchises for the first time, it's to expend the business. The consistent withcy went out the window because the franchise owners were changing up the menu to something that they liked other than what McDonald's kind of thing, and that McDonald's is very systemized. Even the original brothers, McDonald's brothers, were very systemized and how they made what they made. That's why it was so revolutionary. But when Ray CROC took over, not best of reasons, but anyway, you see the movie, you don't know what I mean. Is once he started pushing out to people, all these business owners were seeing it as a cash cow but wanting to change up some Hadd Tacos, some had all these different in grace and it was just a bit of a Shamoz. Yeah, where it was like if you sign this contract, you need to abide to the McDonald's. You know the experience exactly. And Look, I would argue that. You know, we've talked about McDonald's before, but having worked there that with it's very oddi McDonald. Don't you know that? I thought we talked about we go. Oh, yes, that was my first job. I was and I was like amazing at it. I got to remember the month and ended. I went to like the conference, and this is like, as a fourteen year old or fifteen year old, I was yeah, yeah, I was. I was a maccus girlfriend. I don't fast food. My sister did for like a week now. I've done a few fast foods. I've done subway as well, but anyway, the point was is that I actually learned. I'm really although I'm not a massive MacDonald's person at all, I actually think and and I don't know how what it is now, but it was an amazing introduction to brand and business and customer service. So I think it's probably taken a few steps back since everything, so like digital now, but absolutely, I I honestly think it was one of the best things...

I did in terms of getting into business, because I just learned so much about how important brand and consistency and customer service is and, you know, and hard work, like you're not. You don't just stand around. You know it's all. You're doing a lot of stuff. So also, were speas Akut was wondering if my quarter pounder was going to be exactly the same on my chips are going to be this day and each time. Yeah, I think you were really worried about that one. A fat pencils been sticky. Let's get back on tenses. Yeah, I could give you another one about McDonald's, but I white was amazing. But yeah, another day, other day, brand promise. I found these. I'm calling it a brand promise. It's not articulated as such, but yeah, the idea of everyone matters, everyone prospers, everyone is included. MMM, it's fair again. It's that everyone right, it's that whole like we are for, because we all often argue. You and I are like, don't make your brands for everyone. It's got to be specific, like's Australi opposed to going whatever. Yeah, but in actual fact they probably are one of the only people who, only one of the only brands who really can say that because of the monopoly status. You know, there's not a lot, there's not much else to compete with. So, yeah, if you're going to post something, yeah, it's actually event. It's similar with their brand values trust, inclusivity and powerment, safety. I believe that's what they value. Trust. I don't think it is really a value. I think that's me you earned personally, but to work towards it as a goal, yeah, yes, that's yeah, fun. And then, in terms of a central brand theme, which I think was what they board who was the identity team that refreshed Australia Post in two thousand and nineteen, was to see or position themselves as the backbone of the nation. Yeah, them, I think some I think someone could argue with, you know, coal being the backbone sometimes. But in terms of what they they are. It's like we can't fail kind of thing. It's yeah, if without us things go a crop, I kind of thing. Well, exactly. I mean you to try and imagine a time I, like an Australian, without Australian Post. You know, that's where you see how just vital that service is, because, I mean, I imagine, like you can't even really like who how would you get anything anywhere? So, yeah, I do think that if you kind of reverse the thinking, it does make you go, okay, well, this is what we you know, this is the place we hold within Australia, and so I think I think that's a kind of a clever way of looking at it as well. So that's actually another great segue to what we like to talk about in terms of the actual visual brand and what that looks like. And so yeah, so when they did that refresh in two thousand and nineteen more, the company who, the branding agency that redid that, have some beautiful content around that case study. And so they I think they, you know, I'm going to just say it straight out. Overall did it sterling job of that refresh. They've really brought it up to okay. So how can I take a step back? Okay, the logo. Let's start it. Yeah, let's start with the logo. Do Lucky. We did that disclaim at the start. There were a little bit you get, it's a banter instruction is yeah, so I show the post like. Let's describe it frank if you don't know what it looks like. It's it has been. It was designed in one thousand nine hundred and seventy five. It is a if you imagine you've had a red circle that's been cut like it's got a the negative space of the PE inside the circle, but once the one side is like a half moon and crest semicircle, or not even quite a half moon, but that sort of shape, and then the other side is like a horn. So it goes from thick at the bottom up to a thin kind of point which is like one of those horns that they used back in, a postal horn exactly. And so it's a really iconic logo and I'm sure, unless you're not in Australia, anybody listening would know it. And of course you'll be able to see all this on our instagram with the Post. So if you know, I didn't know. I had no idea, but the whole postal horn thing no. Until into rhys I was like, okay, glad that you said that because I was like I never knew. It's like finding the bear in the toblarone. Oh, go now you'll lend. Now I'm gonna see you're gonna Google this now. Yeah, it's in the matterhorn, mountain in tweeds. Hey, that's brilliant. I'm a look, but you know exactly. And when I saw, when I read that about the Horn, I, you know, I was like, I thought,...

...he's just excellent. You know, I love that sort of hidden because most people won't know right the horn. You know, that's we don't know when uses that. I didn't even know what a postal horn was, but having looked back up in terms of makes sense usage on the wikipedia surge tells yes, I went is it's used in thirty two other countries about a postal horn in their logos, but not as not as minimal as what Australia post uses, which is right up my alley and doing. Yeah, the postal horn is a valved he's a bit of Trivia, for it is a valveless cylindrical brass instruments, so kind of like a bugle type of shade. Yeah, but round, kind of like a French horn. Look at me with my instruments. Yeah, boom, tissue somewhere. Here we go. Yeah, that's not even the right appropriate kind of sound. For this instrument was used as a horny choice. WHAT DO I hate? I have that like the sad horn. But okay. Anyway, the instrument was used to signal the arrival or departure of a postwriter or male coach into town, which is pretty fun. That coming I love. Do you know? That's what they should do now on the back like Mr We'pen a postal horn. I still that's what they should have done with their a brand. They should have there's no sure, Wawn, there's those instances where they leave that little slip of paper and they don't even knock on your car. They're in the thing. They probably not. I can't be bothered. Got People little walk up to the now will in our old house in Brisbane, our other house in Britain. They actually that was exactly what happened because the house was so far away from that. Let a bottles down. It's Annoying Hill. So they're just feel like, you know, don't worry about that. I was putting a little bottom anyway. Yeah, so that's biggest grip me too. Apart from that, I find terms of their braining, I wonder if they took originally when they made this and I don't know what it looked like before Australia post was conceived in one thound, one hundred and seventy five, but the red, usage of the red just reminds me of the UK's Royal Mail. That Association for me with Watching Position Pat English show. Yes, in the day. If you haven't seen it, living under it's a child, especially if you're born in the s or older, and I just wonder if there's that that correlation between the two. Yeah, I'm I was sound interested in that as well, because there wasn't. I couldn't find anything specifically about why they picked red, but I do my resent color and a flag as well. Yeah, but I reckon it was connected to the UK. I think that makes sense. Color Wise, I used the same color that there's yellow, there's red, is and there hasn't a bit of baby. Yeah, yeah, the colors, but typically it's us is read. Yeah, and interestingly, you know, I think in terms of again that heritage is if you if it was sort of calling off symbolism from the UK, for instance, to when we when it started in Australia. Like using those references is not necessarily a bad thing because people are familiar with them. So if you, you know, had that familiarly with the UK, you go, are you read as post and that makes sense, whereas in the in the states, I'm pretty sure their boxes are all blue. So it's not read. These read a bit in the thing when they read the same the same colors of flag as well as but the boxer, I think, are read a sorry, blue, blue. Yeah, they're definitely, I'm sure, like, yes, yeah, that's what they are called. All I think I was that is human from Seinfeld. Every time I think of the US Postal Service. Really. Yeah, yeah, stupid old vans that they had with the open door on the side. Anyway. So they've kept that logo mark, that yes, symbol that Delphi describe before and they haven't changed that since started seventy flight, which I think speaks to the heritage of not messing with a logo like everyone wants to. And also it's really just, you know, iconic and strong. Less now. Yeah, yeah, yeah, but it's a range. It would be a big mistake. And I'd also you know, one thousand nine hundred and seventy five not a long time ago, and I be interesting to see what else was kind of on par lowgoes on town for maybe coming out then. Ye, see, and Telstra's had some. You have that see in Ye, yeah, but that was true. That was in a like a it was a to do with the no, no, no, this like the negative space. Yes, like it was a logo focused on the negative space. So, yeah, I think. Yeah, well, anyway. So, yeah, so they've had that same one, but they have gone through iterations of how that looks with the with the logo, the logo type. Yeah, the word marks. So there when we talk about word mark or logo type of talking about the words that appear next to something. So yet originally it kind of started with this like black just Australia post written in a San Seraph, which looks pretty similar to what it does today. Yeah, well, and I think that was part of the refresh was to kind of pull it back to where, you know, again...

...reflecting on that heritage but bringing it kind of up to speed. And then it kind of went through a few where they kind of dropped Australia right down and just made it post for a while and then they kind of put it in like a red box. There was something going on there. They were trying to like keep it all together and like boxing. Look up color. Yeah, exactly. And then they actually just had the symbol reversed out on read in a Red Square. So that was sort of a another kind of weird fit. Not Weird, but an interesting transition. And then yet in a twenty nineteen, when they did this refresh with more they pulled the they pulled it, they freed it again, the logo mark free did it from its bounds and yeah, they read, you know, readid this word mark and the they did a designer custom, which is my favorite part of this. This would be something needs proth on. I love it. Brands do this, though. No, it's not a cheap office. Did it for the YEP, that kind of illustra looking type of it's posted. Okay, has done one baby. See, there's a few. Yeah, so that. Yeah, I mean bigger. It's worthwhile for bigger brands to do because, yeah, it can take you know, and distinctiveness and also it's check the unit. If you're paying for eighty thousand font licenses cost a fortune. So you know, yeah, if you're owning your own point typeface, then it's yeah, it look at. It's definitely a something for bigger businesses to consider if they're you know, I mean I'm sure Cadbury has, like there's a quite a few that had happen has their own. Yeah, yeah, yeah, so, so that was designed by Vincent Chan of matter of sorts, and he is a type designer in Australia. So he did that in with a well, I guess for commissioned for by and it's called AP type appropriately. But yeah, no, really lovely way of and you can just see it across you know, I guess anybody in the public wouldn't really probably notice the difference between that typeface and any other number of sand seraph typefaces, but when you kind of see it spread across the whole gamut of like communications it's got, it creates this really lovely feel overall and I think that's when you can really gage how a typeface works. So it has, it's got, you know, some soft elements but also kind of dumb, you know, demand some kind of respect as well. So I think it's a really yeah, it's a really excellent solution in terms of the how that type is communicating. And then that was obviously what they've used for the logo type. Yeah, yeah, word mark and then kind of thing with this visual identity is it does look a bit similar, as others kind of out there want, in the particular for me, which is another very big and heritage brand, as well as Westpack Bank and their color sort of scheme is very akin to that. Yeah, I mean. But having said that, they are in different industries, so having similarity in that respect is a bit of a moot point. It's just interesting that when you go to Westpack site and you go to t really post, to me the just even from memory, they feel a little similar. Well, if we're talking banks, though, I would say the big issue there is that nab and westpact and that similar so that you know, if you're going to go, what's the red and red and black, I think you know that's when I choose there because I bank with that. That you go, yes, so do I, but they yeah, so that's in an interesting thing. But yeah, that you know, in terms of similarity, whereas I think actually what Australia post has done is lightened right back off the black with the re the refrench. So they're brought in this kind of whereas the banks are sort of skill using. You know that, but they've lightened everything up a whole lot with this kind of Beiji, I don't know, it's even yeah, it's a Baijian and they sort of that gray. Yeah, and then they's a gray and yeah, so it's very kind of, you know, a lot more fresh, but and the photography speaks moldy in my opinion. Yeah, it tells a whole. You know, this is again a bit like when we talked about well, actually in all the brands that we've talked about so far, like it's just, you know, good photography really plays a huge part in how you communicate your brand to your consumers. So I just yeah, it's really that bringing all of those elements together, because when you look at their photos, for instance, you really get a feel for who there. You know that they work across a huge gamut of the community there. You know they're they're how they work, even their videos and what have you. It's the language...

...that they're using is really informative but also conversational. Like you don't, I don't feel like any small business would kind of feel like this is out of like I can't understand this, so I can't communicate with them. So I think that's really important they've kept it simple. But yeah, kind of just like those shots of if it's in a rural town, no one's cover around, so empty street and you just see the red postbox. Yeah, it's like a strong the lone red, you know, van delivery set with an Australian backdrop of a landscape just remote and it just yet it stands out like a sort of now but yeah, you don't Miss It. Yeah, and that exactly like those red trucks are just like so, you know, as you said, you can see them from a mile away, yeah, or several miles away. Yeah, no, exactly. And so I think, I think in terms of that red, like you know, they've obviously just refine in this refresh there for a find. It right back down to using that color and being really specific with that and, you know, spreading that all the new branding across all of their past like parcels and packaging and store fronts and uniforms and trucks and you know, there's so many things. So that the other color, I guess, is that yellow, the fluorescent kind of yellow, because that is used in situ. So all their post bags are that yellow. And so the red office, he had to work with that to you know, and that's been important as well. And then with their express post, that's a kind of deeper yellow. Yeah, that's exactly right, to all their boxes of that yellow as well. So yeah, I think, I think we're all, you know, as I said, in Australia, you kind of we probably are. Yeah, you can't miss it and you know and you eat, you know, even those differences without that's another thing that's, you know, great signaling is that you know, the postbox means pot. They read one means it's going to be slightly slower than the Yellow One, like you don't even you know that information. So and it like rain one for really fast, super fast, and it's groat on. They maybe green's going to be like for ECO. So it's even slower, like we're going to take our time, that we're gonna actually yeah, yeah, hopefully it gets it well. Actually, that's an interesting point that you said, because something that they, I did see a lot of, was it they're really upping their electric vehicles and so because obviously they transport so much, so their carbon footprints obviously fairly massive. So they actually are do like up in their fleet of electric vehicles. Across. And I know I don't know if you have this, but here in Perth we have all of the delivery that the delivery bikes are electric and they've got like they're bright yellow, they've got like a they're like a little buggy and they've got like a sun shade. And do you have the same thing? We don't hear because really here. So the electric would last all that on. So we still got the iconic red, downy looking first, which become really popular, popular. Now people were trying to buy them and then they came out with a new model and they were like lost their minds over it. But they're really vintage kind of retro look, especially in some areas of Sydney. Yeah, yeah, I've been like new don and all that kind of here. Yeah, kind of cool to run around in an old KITCHI motibike. I still basting. Yeah, just, yeah, but they cool fun. Yeah, they're definitely evolving. I've seen them before around Sydney, but it's typically in flatter parts of yes, but they never do they do look try. Oh, they're incredibly darky. They're also, I would imagine, a whole bunch of safer. So you know, when you've got all these people out on the roads, you have to make like they obviously stand out so much, but yeah, they're. Yeah, so I think that's I guess that's an interesting thing that they've really kind of built on. As well as that, you know, we know our impact, like what we're doing has a huge impact, so we need we're trying to counter that as much as possible. And then for social media, pretty consistent emails. They language is really nice. I actually signed up for something last night because I knew you did that last week, which I thought was clever, and I did want to ask you if you bought you go to product, but we won't do that now. I am I signed up to one of the emails last night and yeah, we'll look. was just really again, but, you know, the language was really welcoming and can you know, created connection straight away, which I think feeds back to that idea of, you know, all those touch points maintaining that those values around connection and that the importance of that. So I thought that was really good. And Yeah, I tho, you know, in terms of their social feeds and what have you, they've got, as you said, they're quite consistent. They've also got look at some...

...that I really really notice that. They you might argue this, but I couldn't really remember them doing many ads, but they've definitely got a lot of that. They've got a youtube channel which sort of shares a lot of people's stories and I thought that was really interesting actually, because it plays around. It's very informative to see how a lot of businesses use Australia Post. So it was definitely on that level of okay, if I was, you know, having just any you've had experience with it as well, but if I was having to ship a bunch of staff, I can actually see how that works now, like it's really informative, I think, and again using language that isn't hard to digest, which is helpful. And Yeah, so that was on the Youtube was quite I'm just looking up on this Australia post advertising. I don't videos I'm looking at here. I don't remember any of them. On the ADS I've seen more recently. Is just about delays in terms of stick with us, like being weir this kind of thing which I think, yes, for community message, just to give a bit of respect, I guess, to their team. Yeah, in times where, you know, it's like we've got billions of pack yeah, is coming through the back. Yeah, especially when we had a public holidays at ones days a couple weeks ago, and then with covid and everything like, we only get post to live it every second day here, just normal posts and then packages every day. And that guy's chocolate block and room about four of them a day that come up and down. Yeah, well, they did change that recently so that normal post was only set every second day and that packages could be every day. So then you kind of also now getting more, you know, more trucks out on the street because they call the couriers who are doing delivering though. So yeah, no, I think that. I think there's obviously being that we'd have, you know, we had to be patient in this sense because of this what's happening we do in the world. So I think most people have. I do wonder with brands like Australia Post, let's say, you know, the big corporates, if it's tells true or opticus is, having social media accounts, just how much engagement you get out of something like that? Like what? Why do you follow Australia Post for? Like, what would be the reason you would follow Australia post for and I've heard my quest and talk about this in terms of engagement, it's like yeah, there, they're widely followed, but they've got bugg roll engagement and yeah, it's just a kind of shop and be present and being that kind of thing and have the page. That's he may as well have a team that shows what we're doing behind the scenes. Maybe humanized that availability as well. I think it's maintaining that across your touch points. So if people are there, then you're a laced having a presence which again reminds people of what to do. But I do like that their first thing on that, for instance on the Instagram, is if you have a customer service query, just get the link in our thing like, because obviously what they don't want is people just posts sending the messages on the inste like I've got the shots with my where's my delivery? And they're like, Oh, I'm just the social media manager, like I am, I don't know where you post. So yeah, I think I agree, though it's one of those interesting ones where they're such big brands but really, do people care to interact with their social media? So yeah, so it's a funny one, but I mean they've got, you know, I guess it's probably shows they've Australian Post Princes only got that twenty seven thousand followers compared to a big brand that interacts all the time with their consumers. So yeah, it's probably not the place necessarily for it, but all right, in terms of other brands. Yeah. So the brain experience in general of what Australia Post offers to me fairly consistent. If you go the post offices, they generally look pretty similar, depending on size. Some of very is tiny, like our one in our town is quite significantly small or, as other bigger to the towns have bigger ones, which is it a pleasant because some you have a variety of people working behind the desk, because some of these smaller ones the people that work there are he's like helpful. I think that's just where we are. Is Unfortunate. But in terms of what they have in these stores is really quite amazing. The breadth of service is ridiculous. You can go get your passport photos there, you can get insurance, you can send money, you can deposit money, like I bang with iron as well and to deposit money if I wanted to put key ash into my account, I have to go to a post office still. Is it that? So just to know all the different things that are kind of going on. They do so exactly, as well as some partnerships that they want, and they want more of those partnerships to keep people coming into the retail stores. Well, for those Frenchise I think that's the way that they can make some more money. Yeah, as well, and some of the products that you see they're very kitchy, as seeing TV kind of look. Yeah, product, yeah, pretty fun. especially I think...

...the probably the demographic that does does go into post office is more regularly are of an older generation, because it's a generational thing that it's just always been and that's what they've done. Yeah, they might be buying things in the store to send grand kids. Yeah, the members something to add whatever they're just setting as a card, for instance. It's a place that you can also buy something else. They're like a gift or whatever. LOVES BUYING SOME OF THE POST office. I'm really sure. Such yeah, shout out to my mom and I'm Shatt yeah, mom. Yeah, no, I completely agree. Like they still just, you know, they've always got those like thing, like all those different things you can buy and packs of books and I mean it gets that kind of fundabout where else you find things? All the coins. They've also got all like those coins. Yeah, that's brilliant. I love that stuff. And then pio boxes, I think, was another one. For a lot of businesses or people that don't want to have medicine to their home because it gets stolen or whatever, is having a peer box that I've never actually use a peo box before. Oh, we, my parents again still have one, but we grew up with one and I've had one for had the one for the business as well for a while when I was living somewhere. But Yeah, look, I think that there's that cheap and yeah, there I think there was. That was also at the time when you kind of had to pretend like you were a massive business, where it's like now everyone works from home, so it's completely fine to know people's addresses. Like I feel like it's changed the whole you know, way. We again, it's one of those things where there was this time we had to have a post office of box because that made you professional, whereas now it's like it's just an extra experience. Yeah, but I in terms of I agree. In terms of that brand experience, as we talked about it throughout the today, there's been so many kind of touch points, you know, that you encounter without not even necessarily knowing how frequently you might use the Australia Post brand. And I think what's particularly interesting is that it because the built some of the buildings themselves are heritage listed. That's Kinda created another connection to the heritage of what they are like, as we spoke about before, like that they'd measure the distance to a town from where that the post office was and you know, so the the idea of post within Australia has besides what we encounter every day. It does have that like like historical, you know, experience that Australians has been on anywhere. Yeah, and nostalgic, think you that's the words and I think so that you know that in itself creates, you know, memory, story, experience, all of those things that build on the brand. And again, thinking about when they did this refresh recently, you know, it's I think it was really a respectful for a lot of those things and they didn't they didn't kind of remove they brought it up to speed, which I like we've talked about this before, but you know, brand's definitely need to evolve and grow. That's really important. But what's really like, what's crucial to kind of marry that growth is not losing the essence of what the brand is and what people know it to be, and I think that's why they've done it so well is that they have really like lifted it, brought it up to a kind of a contemporary place, but they haven't lost any of those you know, those nostalgic feelings about the brand, those historical memories and all of that sort of you know, all of those things. You don't see Australia post in a historic building and then go this look doesn't fit. So I think they've managed that super well. Definitely, definitely, apart from this with touched on distinctive assets that they do have. I mean you see express post boxes as well as the standard post boxes, which are just you know, it's one of the things is like where's the nearest postbox? And you just driver and you can see it so quickly. Yeah, yeah, there's always one sort of in any town. Star Trek Express, the career service is very different to what Australia posts brands it as it's blue, it's still uses the pieces. It's Shoehorn, post corn shape of the symbol. Yeah, Star Trek Express. They kept that, and even that in itself is very distinct. But it's not like you go into a star Trek Place to drop offs. You can pick up sometimes parcels if they're but usually just going to buy stuff. Yeah, yeah, but yeah, it's usually just their vans that they'll career across, you know, towns and things like that. You see in a lot more. So it wasn't highways, which I was on this morning, but the...

...other thing was the distinctive thing for me, as well as just the postman or postwoman person themselves. Just, yes, that's the the face to face interaction you would probably have on them and it makes it plays a big part. Right. So my again, growing up, we used to leave a Christmas card and Christmas biscuits out for the Post's notice. So, yeah, well, it's my parents are into that, which is lovely. I really again like feet. They really ref like to recognize, you know, those people in the community and you know, I remember even last year during the pandemic, got dropped in a thank you card to the post office because I was like, I know this is really, you know, hard for you, and not not that this is about us, but I think that those people, like a lot of people in customer service, really make or break your relationship with a brand. Right. And so when I spoke before about the person who the delivery driver the post who didn't ever like to deliver parcels into counter, that the courier who we had in Brisbane who was on our run. His name was Charlie and he, yeah, got to know him. I'd so many packages but also so lovely and he would actually, if he saw me walking with my tribe of children and I had all you stand out like a post box with those kids, and so he would actually like turn around and come back if he saw me. But I wasn't home when he went to deliver the package. Good and I was like so, you know, so my you know, emotional connection now to having that post like that package delivered from Australia post is really strong because I had this really fantastic person who was behind, you know, doing the hard work. And so I think that, yeah, all of those, if we think about touch points, brand experience, all of those sorts of things. They all feed into the story that you have around a brand and that can change over time, obviously, but I think I think it's really important to note how we react to certain interactions that we have around a particular brand and what that means to us going forward when we want to talk about them or what words we have, you know, to say about them. MMMM I was going to quickly just before we wrap up. Used so my career guy, he blasts heavy metal when so many opens his store. You know he's there. Okay, Buddy, whatever gets you through. Hey, whatever. Okay. So in terms of we do this sort of last little part of here of do we like or use his brand? Of course we use his brand. Yeah, of course. My wife at the moment, as I said earlier in the episode, she uses it quite a bit now. So we have a lot more interaction with Australian post from deliveries but also sending. She sipping her products over season domestically too, and so far so good, apart from that one express pose. But it that. Yeah, for us, the in the store experience is a little bit of a drag, but otherwise it's been pretty fine. There are conjectures, I think, with a lot of people that have those experiences that do bring it down a peg, which I think is unfortunate for any kind of brain like me. Even for me going to Ikea today, I went in the exit door. Guys like no, no, this is an exim like there's no one here. I'm walking through the just and to war. You go around us. Oh my God, yeah, it's in the side like here. Okay, yeah, if all about moving you in the one way always I would in the back way. If you want to get to the warehouse, just walk in through the chickens. That's the trick. I digress. Don't about yourself for up. Yeah, no, I actually you know, I'm I've had some good and bad experiences with delivery and with customer service with Australia Post over the years and I definitely think that you I feel like to an extent they do pretty well for the size of what they are, like I feel most but for the most part. One of the things that I do think is really interesting that we didn't really touch on because neither of us have had experience with that, but how the business actually supports other businesses in terms of like having labeling machines and all of this sort of stuff, which is when maybe if you are one of those businesses who use Australia Post, and I've know a couple of my clients have, there would be really interesting to hear your experience with that, if you're willing to share it, because I think those sorts of systems that they can actually help businesses themselves grow is, you know, that's a really amazing tool to help other businesses actually, you know, grow themselves, because shipping is such a big part. So even like for Sam, but in actual fact, if she gets bigger, you might go will now in it to get that postal printer thing at home. So that's what mean? We do? We do print stuff at home already. Yeah, yeah, which makes a sticker thing stick is no, just one paper and then she sticks it...

...on. So we couldn't have us to get the sticker thing. Maybe that's the next step. Then you can review it. Let's go. But yeah, so I think I'm look, my experience is that, I think, and I've shared it already, I I like that the brand has maintained its heritage. I've had reasonably good experiences, like anything with people. When you're dealing with people, some days a good. Sundays are bad, but on a whole I think we're very fortunate to have such a service. Yeah, in Australia. I feel very grateful for that. That, you know, does allow a lot of businesses to thrive. It allows us to get a bunch of stuff, you know, delivered and done and and I'd also just do a shout out to, you know, the Eightyzero people who work there and say thank you. Yeah, never I don't know any post people do this one around the corner. The Guy Lives around the corner, but anyway, it doesn't matter. Look, everyone, thank you for putting up with us today. We was definitely a little bit yeah, it's Pretty Funny Day. Maybe it's like some Merdery credators. I don't even understand. That's to say it it's hilarious. No, thank you for sticking around today. If you've stayed on this long, really shopping? You if you're going the cleaning house, I don't know. thankly, tell us what you're doing yet know what you're doing while you're watching listening? Yeah, trank, goodness, you're not watching. No, thank you very much for joining us today. If you want to connect with us at all, we you can follow us at branding banter on instagram and you can find both of our respective websites and social media handles, also on our instagram, or you can check in the show notes. Yeah, thank you and, of course, like always, we love getting any feedback, any reviews on apple podcast or give us a shout out. We really appreciate that. If you've had some gotten some value from the episode today and next week next week, here we are talking about a brand that I ring absolutely love this brand because it's just standing. It's an Australian brand and there's not too many technology companies based in Australia that make products. And they called road. You might have heard of him. I'm speaking into a road microphone, I pod MIC, and using the massive fan, massive fans road casting brow if you're into this kind of stuff. I have road marks for my cameras. It's such a fantastic brand in terms of the breadth of what they offer and really high quality stuff. A little biased because I did win a competition with him and they did send me a couple of grands worth of stuff, but I had been buying that. Yeah, all this stuff before hands. I did already have this stuff I just got more of it, yeah, which was nice good. But do you know what I think is I'm looking forward to hearing from you when you talk about it, if because you know it's one thing to be sent free stuff, but not all free stuff is good. But you will set you are a genuine fan. I'd buy it without being yeah, yeah, yeah, well, you just love them. So I'm going to be really interested to hear you fan, Fan boy, I can say Fanella, put my whip, lady, frank, lady, frank, Adam. Yeah, so that we're going to do that next weekend. That's going to be episode eight, which is super exciting. And yes, till then, that the chap today, frank, and for everyone who's joined us. We'll see you in the next episode, episode a road. My friends to be there. A WE SQUARE.

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