Branding Banter
Branding Banter

Season 2, Episode 10 · 1 year ago

S2 EP10 - Bluey

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

🎙 It’s time for some more banter!

In this episode, we’re shining our banterous spotlight on a different kind of brand, one that both Frank & Delphie have bought into considerably and so have both our sets of kids. It’s the Aussie animated TV show success story that is, Bluey.

Bluey has become an international brand being broadcast around the world on ABC here in Australia, TVNZ in New Zealand and Disney+ in most parts of the world like the UK and USA. Becoming the most watched kids program on Australian TV.

But since it started in 2018, Bluey has expanded into a brand beyond the television screen and into our children’s lives with toys, books, stationery, games, outdoor play equipment and even a live stage show.

So in this episode we look under the hood of what makes Bluey a brand and not just another animated TV show, to identify how it positions itself, how it communicates with key messaging, how it communicates visually in its identity and what brand experience it offers its broad audience and consumers, both kids and parents alike.

FOR REAL LIFE!

And this is also our final episode of Branding Banter Season 2. To stay in touch with the show and with us as co-hosts, you can find our details below.

See you next year!

🎙 Where to find more about Delphie & Frank

Branding Banter on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brandingbanter/

Delphie Website: https://www.seecreative.com.au/

Delphie Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/seecreativestudio/

Frank Website: https://www.gdayfrank.com/

Frank Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/gdayfrank/

A frank good, a healthy time to start the banter. Yeah, let's go randing banter. Good and welcome to branding banter, the podcast that shines a spotlight on Australian businesses for business owners, brand consultants and designers, so that we can identify how a brand helps a business connect with their consumers, while of course, having a bit of a back and forth between each other, a banter, as we call it, about a featured Ozzy brand each week. I'm your hostdealthy, and this is my co host, frank, and before we'd begin, we just like to acknowledge the traditional owners of the land in which we are both recording the podcast on today. I'm on the beautiful coast or why Jack Country and frank is on the mountainous Gandangara country. We pay our respects to the elders, past, present and emerging as co hosts of branding banter, we individually run our own branding consultancies from two different sides of Australia. So frank runs get a franc from the blue mountains west of Sydney, while I run sea creative from Perth in Western Australia. And here we are, the final episode of Season Two, episode ten. Welcome to do like more than ten episodes this season, but maybe it's because we've been going so, you know, we've been consistent with them. Yes, I mean, I guess that's intentional. Yes, yes, ten weeks as a long time through a bit. That's good. Yeah, yeah, we've got quite well. I think we should give ourselves a pat on the back. I don't have I don't have that sound effect, but very good actually. Yah. So ten episodes at some obviously to the after today I'll be two episodes. But yeah, feeling it's been really interesting doing it this way this season. So first season was we did a lot of interviews. We kind of like finding our feet. We were talking to businesses about, you know, the impact branding has had on their particular business, sharing insights those of things, whereas this season we decided to do something a bit different where we were kind of critiquing Australian brands, and particularly ones that were quite well known, so that we could obviously learn from there what they've done and, you know, made me look at how we can use that that information for our own brand building and understanding our own consumers and those sorts of things. So I think it's been a really interesting mix. Yeah, doing it this way. I wonder if we did like next season it's just like the opposite word. It's not wellknown brands and then seeing how they could take what they have. Good idea, write that down. Yeah, okay, just planning while we're on this. On the role, I think I think what's been really interesting with this season has been the feedback we've sort of had from different people who might not actually even be typically in in branding but who have really enjoyed understanding kind of our you know, our take and our assessment of these particular brand. So there they might be just consumers or other well, they are consumers, but whether they're you know, interact directly with those brands or not. But I think that's been really interesting, hearing feedback from people who are not particularly, you know, brand or business focused, and so I've liked I've liked that a lot, whereas I think, yeah, be interesting if we did do that next season or look at it, you know, maybe unknown brands a kind of critique on what they could do and how we could under you know, help them a little bit more. That could be another way of really kind of the big flex if we did. Yeah, yeah, exactly. So the episodes are we with the brands that we went through each episode. Let's recap it. So episode one, freedom furniture. We were a bit it was a bit of a contentious one terms of just the way they have gone about their rebrands, where it could have been a lot more. But hell, it's there, it's it's it's something that's available, it's present, people will hopefully recognize it over time, and we started with that was sort of the kincher that got us to yes, these angles inception pointed. Yeah, stife, just was hating on it. And episode two was bunnings and we talked about something that is in every state of Australia, even New Zealand, in something that is a market leader, very dominants grown to a scale where you can't help but know the bunning's brand. Yeah, we then switched tunes into a technology company. So it was provider called CANVA. He might have heard of it, you might have used it. Yeah, it's probably have huge now in terms of creating graphics for maybe your...

...social media or for Your Business, social personal brand, whatever. It might be, doing amazing things and since we did that episode. They rebranded kind of, they rework their word mark. Yeah, still, it was very happy about I was he then never sode forwards Kauhala, talking about the mattress company that's evolved into more than just mattresses, into home furniture. The kind of distasteful point for us was that they shipped overseas to their manufacturing processes being now in part in China and some other places as well as Australia. But it would have been awesome if they stuck it here in Australia and kept it going that way. We then did an interesting one where we had two brands, lifeline and beyond blue, different service providers for mental health awareness and of suicide provinces, prevention services and support. Delphie had lifeline, I had beyond blue. Really great episode. It was a different kind of way of going about our episodes. Then we went into one that kind of converted us. I still haven't bought the products. If sorry, I still get you an emails going. I want it. I wanted to want to just know we going today. Yeah, we're definitely in the funnel now. Christmas, president, each and for each of them, once you get it for each other perfect. It was called go to skincare. You might have used it already. I know a few of our listeners had used it, which was awesome, and a few of our friends and colleagues that we yeah to work within the branding space have used it, which was awesome to hear all great positive things, which was fantastic. Yeah, another one you kind of scape at in Australia Australia Post, Australia's national postage and shipping provider. Very interesting kind of brand in that it's not just known for what it is in terms of sending out, you know, letters and boxes and things, like my wife just has done this morning. Yes, it's more than that. It has shop fronts with their sell these different kind of things, has a community involvement and yeah, it's a bit of a complex brand being so big. Yeah, but they'd also just undertaken a refresh, so that was happening. Things that we wanted. That was there in so focused on. Yeah, and then it was my favorite brand, right Ausi brand maybe road microphones, again, the road microphone that I'm speaking in here with a yeah, that was just very indulging. Well, it's interesting, you know, because yesterday I was at jb hi fi looking for something from one of your kids and I was actually attend to your photo because I was in looked at all the road microphones and I was like now I know, like I should have gone to these and it's very exciting. So it's good, good. And then last episode was pet bun talking all things pet care, Australia's leading pet care brand, which has many, many sub brands, so it's a branded house, as you might say, and then other kind of connections to make it a whole rounded brand experience, I guess you'd call Yeah meant in so. So we definitely was we definitely covered a lot in this this season and and it's been really, you know, diverse, I suppose, in each week what we've discussed. So we changed it up from services to products, services to yeah, thing just to really talk about yeah, no, no, and I think it's it's like got a, you know, a nice overview of a lot of different brands and and yeah, what people have taken away. So we're before we get into today's episode ten, hoping that you have the question or yeah, I thought you were going to say something else. then. I was about the press, the Boden to do back quiz. Yes, good, so welcome to the yeah, yes, the last time season two and we're going to carry I think we want to keep this going for next season. But the Ozzi bbq Azi brand better quiz. It might be trade my by then. Who knows, if someone wants to support us with us the trademarkt yeah, procely will set up a Patriot or something. So for this week the quiz is my turn to be the quiz master. And if you don't get this seriously, Oh God, here we go, delty. And for those of you playing at home, what was your brand is remembered for its slogan, which is how many do you do weight bish. Look at that straight up. The excelie. Yeah, that's yeah, that is I do know that one, which is good. You. It's interesting, isn't that? Because you kind of luck. We've spoken a lot about like these brands. So wheat beeks is, is a product brand? It is, and so it's not. It's made by sanitarium. Yes, so it's interesting because we had the same with the Vegi might mmm, you know, and that was what we well, we talked about how Vega might is an iconic brand, but it's actually the product that's the brand, not the the manufacturer. So it's fascinating, isn't it? Having a parent brand. I guess you know the whole new Meta thing for facebook Messag facebook's the product...

...or the Instagram, that kind of thing. Very similar in a friend but that's true. Yeah, yeah, yeah, and I think, I think for a lot of businesses it's interesting to kind of get your head around that. Stuff like that Canna be quite hard because again, like not to go too deep into what is brand again, but you know, the whole concept around it can be quite confusing right, like it's can be really hard to get your head around, like well, who is that? A brand? Is that a productors at both Orpe? Yet so we set that. How do you said that Otu up? Yeah, I mean that's the thing that if you had like amount of trustee, but a lot of Australians would have in vegim mind, and then it's owned by bigger and then it goes across onto the other products, like the peanut butter, and then, you know, if it's cheese and all the rest of it, there's kind of like the trust carries across. You become like a family of things that you can offer here. Yeah, which is interesting. Can you tell me, though, Delphia, just a second Fart to this question. Here, they have another kind of catchphrase or tagline that they're known by. Wheat big said is can you name that? It's kind of like the yeah, I'm going to be my is it? You got to be made? No, that's going to be Maut of Milo. Yes, I'm going got all the other series about a Humm just like a chocolate milkshake, and it got them all. Yeah, what is that? Chocolate Ausi. Kids are weak. Oh, yeah, of course I wasn't kid. Well, you see, we bigs kids. Yeah, yeah, that's China started going anymore though with it. Yeah, it's the kind of the whole brandy. Yeah, it's on their side and everything. Okay, I guess you call it nearly their tag line. Yeah, but it's funny because they've sort of moved out of just kids, you know, like because the all the cricket they sponsor, like the creek. I think the whole thing with wheatbixes using that is that they tap into those that used it as a kid. So they wait till now is a grown adult, or at least Perry's a cricketer. And I say a wee because que because I had that when I started. Yeah, now look at me now. Yeah, this is the result of eating weeks. Personally, Webeaks, do you? I don't like it at all. It just doesn't do it. From I remember doing a challenge TV land when we're doing like a game show kind of development, and one of the one of the Games was to eat a brick of wheatbaks dry. Yeah, gross, and that's like what am I in for here? I just started like coffinable long I thought I had like asbestos in my life. It's like, what is this thing? There's so many, there's like a whole way. You have to eat weetbeks. Yeah, have to eat them. So there. I used before I was allergic to honey. When I wasn't allergic to honey, I would put the wheat biks in, drizzle the honey over, pour the milk on, eat it as fast as you can. So what you don't want to do with wheat biks is let them go soggi the sogginess is the is were, in my opinion, the terrible part. And even my kids are like, I need mob Olk if I haven't eaten a quick week. So always like eat it now, quickly. Think that's fast as again before get sunny. So I think if you if you get the perfect balance of milk and dry wheat bigs biscuit together, it's actually delicious. But if you miss that window of eating your it's all over it. Right. Well, welcome to another episode of Masters Jets Australia with delfy. With thirteen minutes in, let's crack into episode. This week we are focusing, oh yeah, more banter. We are focusing on the ozzy kids TV show brand blue to dona play the theme June. There it is, stop the morning part. There we go. All right. So, in terms of the blue brand, it's an entertainment brand. It's not so much similar to what we've had before of being a service or a product. It's something slightly different now, but it's becoming now a product based brand that has so many different things out there that you can buy as a result of what they have to offer, of the fandom the family, both the kids and for adults. Yeah, we're both, think fan boys fan girls. Yeah, of the show. So what they offer is an animated television show is established in two thousand and eighteen and we'll we pick the brand. Was that? It's an Ezzi brand that's gone fire off, gone international around the world and it's about to launch two weeks from this air date of this episode. I think it's on October. Sorry, November, twenty two or twenty sec and yeah, it was. It's a a second or two Mondays from now. I think it is their fourth season and there they've got what is it, a hundred and a write down here. Hundred five episode. Yeah, three series. Yeah, incredible amount and all I've read that each episode takes three to four months to...

...make, so they're making obviously several simultaneously. But I mean that is just like quite a sounding, isn't it? But yes, yeah, so it's made for preschoolers primarily, so any kids from you know, to to. I mean, yeah, I thought it's more than yeah, I thought it was a bit older, but it is obviously. Yeah. So the two characters in it, so is a kids that are based on four and six. I think the two kit main characters are. Yeah, we'll get into who they are, but it was created by God named Joe Broum He Co. I think he worked on another animated show in the UK called Charlie and Lola. Yes, yea. Anyway, so it portrays six year old female blue heeler dog. Yeah, I don't know what the term is it had I saw something on wikipeda. What it's called? Type of series. You'd call it a one, I thought. And throw and throw pomorphic. So it's like as if there are a human but there a dog. Yes, yes, yeah, they do all then the dog characters, but they do all human activities. Yes, yes, so blue is the girl, six years old. I. We all thought she was a boy to begin with. Well, and this is one of their big things that they were countering this gender stereo type. Yeah, yeah, and she's younger sister Bingo, Father Bandit and a mother Chili. They make up the healer family. Yeah, I love this. Get it. You know, bluie healer. He is good and also I kind of like the play on it. Should get into and the eye and I don't know if this was intentional, but you know how I like to go deep on me and the healer family. You know what the show does? It kind of reminds, which will get into reminds parents of this experience of why they kind of went into parenting, all the joy of parenting, which is, you know, connecting with your kids, enjoying play, all these sorts of things that I feel like it is the healer with the a though, I feel like it's healing this sort of relationship the parents have with their kids as well. That obvious, very deep. You know how I am, but I you know, I did think about it when stoner's work a little rim shot right there, just buddom. There you go, I know. So I did think it. You know, it's doing a lot of that for families, which will talk about other on but yeah, that's the healer family and been the best part for you. Is that where you used to live? Yeah, well, I got a good going back there, the thing from birth. But yeah, so they are and it's really interesting because it was written, you know, they joe is a father of two girls and that was and actually several people like the I think the other code people, cous produces code people, they were also parents of girls. And then the voiceover guy for the dad bandit from. He's also got two girls. So there's this sort of experience of all these really kind of Dads we are having and I think that's maybe why it's just so authentic, to not overuse that word, but because there is this genuine realness to the story, so I think. Anyway, so that's where we're getting into it without you know, well, it's got into it yet. Even think we mentioned the city was Brisbane in yes, that's right. Yeah, that's right. Rush A bit. Yeah, and it's one callous awards at the moment. Yeah, more than I have fingers and possibly toes photos. Foot fingers, big fingers, big fingers. That was I don't know what episode. That was the episode and it's yeah, so it's one awards here in Australia, an actor award, which is kind of like our Emmy's Oscars type of things as movies and TV shows. Yeah, as well as an International Emmy Award for a best animated kids show and the are the album, oh, and the album two one an Aria. Oh, yeah, the soundtrack grammy's version about grammy. Amazing, so cool. So, yeah, so we're really excited about this because it's it's a sorry, didn't win an area award. It was in the area charts. I just realize it topped to the RAA charts. It didn't win the let's give it to them anyway. But yeah, no, we it is a different kind of brand to talk about today because it's it's not a service product, as typically we've spoken about in the past. By product, yes, service, all product. But yeah, the the thing that's so fascinating about it is that it it could be like anything else. But what has what has happened in that it's become this massive brand with a huge following and it's got real fandom, which I think that, you know, what we like like to do with this brand analysis that we do is like look at what what's going into a particular brand that's created these this sort of connection with the audience and why?...

What have they done that's made it something that so many people, you know, enjoy, thrive on kind of want to promote? And so, while it's, sort of, yeah, not typical for what the other kind of businesses we've spoken about previously, it's got so many elements that I think any kind of business can still kind of tap into and think about in their own mode of their own works. Yeah, essentially making a brand, for sure. All righty, so let's let's dive straight into perfect target market and positioning here. Because I think at the end of the day, you've heard a should bull of why we do what we do here. Are It's just a broad critique of what we see, an experience of the brand to maybe help you see it a little bit deeper. Maybe I mean here like you've already gone deeper, root deeper, that you'll be like, we can think about that, but you might, yeah, you might get something out of this to apply to your own business, your own personal brand, or if you're thinking of making an animated kid show, who knows? Yeah, so in terms of target market, a positioning here, target market. Yeah, this is one of the best parts about what the Blue Brand is done because it's not typical and we've spoken a big brands already on the show and we've talked about how, you know, some brands like bunnings or Stradi poster for everyone. You know, there's that kind of idea. But I think what has been so amazing with what blue he's done is that it has genuinely appealed to both parents and small children and it's like an in equal amounts, you know, cross generational, so much so that there's a podcast run by two mums who are just massive blue fans. You know, that's they've done that on their own, like a cord, and they talk about each episode of Blue because they just love it so much. So you know they've it's really hit accord with, you know, two completely different generations and even more so like grandparents and everyone in between. So get the empress one's a good point. Actually. There's an episode in blue where they have grandparents, like bluies. Grandparents are a part of the show, and it's a bit where the grandmother is trying to work the IPAD. It's exactly my mom. Yes, I like call and you got this wag, weird like Double Chin view from below kind of thing on the cool starts and it's like that's so brilliant. Yeah, yeah, that so. I mean they really and I think that's again what happens is that they, the grandparents, can also connect, especially grandparents, to are, you know, maybe looking after their kids a bit more, a lot, you know, involved in their life and what I view. So it's Um, yeah, they've really kind of secured this rare position in a family market, alte jowlational. Yeah, absolutely. I would also go as far as to say that it's not even just families like I feel like people who have a connection with children and caring for children in some capacity, whether they aren't these uncle's, you know, those sorts of people also, you know, are aware of the blue brand. So it's Um, it's really, you know, it's really hit a chord with a lot of people. And and if we look at who their competitors are, you could gable, you know, any kids TV show, right, but you're not getting the same passion for paw patrol. You're not getting you know, you're not getting this m but not not from it. Not From It. Yeah, not from a multigeneration kind of that's what I mean. Yeah, so multigenerational. It's there's this I feel like something that's maybe, you know, on par would be play school, where people are kind of themselves like a parents of maybe grown up with play school as well, and now their kids are what you get and they feel like that's okay TV. And I feel like that's what blue he's doing. It's like, AH, I'm okay to put my kid in front of this, like I feel I feel empowered when I'm doing this, like I feel like I'm doing them a you know, it's a good thing for them that's what you kind of feel like. Stuff on Youtube exactly right. So I feel like that's what's that. You know they have a huge you know there's some exorbitant amount of competition for Bluey. But I think when we think about positioning, I feel like it's taken this kind of place that says this is okay for you to have your kid in front of. In fact, it's better than okay. You can sit down with your kid and, you know, join in, like this can be enjoyable for you all together. So like people kind of you know, they've taken this position of don't feel guilty for watching this. That's what I that's what I feel like. You'll all learn something from it exactly. The creators said that they wanted to make something that was akin to the experience of kids would have with pepper pig and some kind of learning thing within the family dynamic. Yes, but take it a different step where it's, I think, similar to what Pixar does a lot of their animations, especially toy story, whe there's a lot of adult kind of in jokes. They're yes, it's appealing to both markets. When I saw so toy sty I thought was amazing, as best thing I wanted to be at a matter as a result,...

...you get half the jokes that are in it. So I became a parent and I was like that's that's yeah, yeah, and that's like, you know, that's like the simpsons. So the simpsons kind of was an interesting like obviously an older market, but it always, you know, it always had so many jokes. My auntie loved that. She thought, yeah, genious animation, and she was exactly as a high school and universities scholar, she was Oh, wow, okay, if you think it's good, well maybe I'm not smart enough because I don't find it funny at all. But yeah, I think it's one of those funny words. But yeah, it's interesting to kind of assess the differences and and when a brand has been able to really pinpoint that place in so many generations mind as being something you know, of quality of so easily and so quickly, though, I think that's the difference. Yeah, that's true. It really hasn't taken a long time. It has just taken off and leaps and bounds and and it's interesting to think about how that's really happened. So, you know, in most cases, for for a brand to grow from something quite small to something quite big. It's it is through word of mouth, right. It's from people going you should watch this, it's from other people suggesting it. It's that social proof of saying, you know, I have you seen this episode, and then sharing, and I think we've talked about this before, but this idea of scene uses where it's the people that you know would love it and then talk about it. And so absolutely I think that that was one of the key, the key elements for it to start growing was that so many families connected to it and told their friends. Yeah, but then there's well, you've got another aspect of you know, if it's position for these this kind of audience here, it's then also positioned in a certain markets that would understand it. I don't know whether or not it transcends different cultural family dynamics. I'm not too sure. But in especially in a Western based family dynamic, yeah, you've really got you got generally two parents, maybe a mom and a dad or same sex mom and dad, and then you've got kids, beat boy and girl or girl girl or girl boy boy, whatever it might be. But to be marketed, mass marketed that same terms of its positioning to those markets. That's how it grows. So it very quickly went to the UK to I think Disney jr over there and my cousins watched it with their kids and they were like, Oh my God blue yeah, we've heard of it, and then it went to the states and the same sort of set up on Disney and outs on Disney plus in pretty much every country apart from Australia and New Zealand and like. It's one of those things in terms of marketing something that if you're out there the most, you're saturating the market with your presence. That's when you start to really grow if you can do that, obviously, if you've got that for your the ability to do but once it has that notoriety behind it, and in this case TV produces an exacts and they can be very stuffy people, some of them, because I didn't used to work in TV, and to try and get a show up is one in a million a lot of the time. M Hit Rais very low. It's like two percent. Every time you pitch something it's significantly low. So to have something that conceptually was understood so quickly and relatable probably to most of the executives in those rooms. You can see why it was picked up, yeah, and why y're gone, because it's that same love affair that you'd have as a parent and your kids as much as it would from a business decision. So that, yeah, have people watching this thing absolutely and I think that. I think that's interesting. What used to touched on before is I did read something months ago and I hadn't been able to find it, but there well, I think they had been slammed, but they'd been some discussion around how it was very a very nuclear family and Blewie had an embraced you know, I guess you know the variety of family situations that that people are living in and and I think there was in it was an interesting I'm not going to have an opinion on this so much, but it was an interesting kind of discussion and I feel like, well, at some point you do you. I feel like you can still relate to the family dynamic. If you're in a family now, if you were grandparents raising a child or if you were same sex, the same sex couple raising a child, you'd probably still be able to connect with much of what they're talking about. And so I feel like while it's not necessarily depict in a particular you know, the family scenario much gender kind of boy, and that's what I think why it's so good, right. It's because they've really tried to to just, you know, flatten that out of like we're not going to make it about gender. You know, there's although there's this like they talk about other fathers of really hands on Dadney does all this stuff and you know there's maybe some some inference to him being a male. It's not, it doesn't appear to be. You know, it Holly Gender stereotyped. So I think that's what that's would be a good thing for why it's appealed to so...

...many people, and I think they've got they built a bit of a universe within itself, like a world within itself where you could explore those themes to make that inclusive, yes, topic of discussion amongst kids, amongst parents, and say, Oh, why does you know this family have two fathers? What is this family? And Yeah, absolutely that kind of yeah, you can bring characters in it and really do that and you know it's a sensitive issue for potentially a lot of families out there, but it might not be in it might be just that open thing that blue can make come to the forefront of other families discussions. Yeah, so they're all around, tolerant and all the rest, and I think that's what it's you know it what it's really trying to do. In a lot of cases, like I don't. I've sense that. I so you've watched way more episodes than me, but because I still know that I haven't seen what I mean. There's a hundred and five, I know, but I was in the real age transition of of like we two thousand and eighteen when I had my third son. Well, he wasn't then, but he was two thousand and eighteen. He was for so he when it was just coming out. He was, you know, four years old and because he had older brothers, we probably didn't watch it as much. But then and then having a baby, you know now toddler, like we're kind of now coming back into the kids watching stuff with him that is appropriate, not some gum stuff. So I'm but my point was that yesterday I did watch something and you know, they were if you had a child who potentially had attention deficit disorder, add adhd, the episode was very much connected to the struggles of some of those sorts of kids. So they use language around. Like, you know, I never pay attention, I can't sit still, I'm always fidgetting. Alissus there the character was sort of talking about this and you know, they never said for a second gave this kid a diagnosis or anything like that right in the episode, but they addressed how this that made this kid feel when he was always told these things and how actually he had to swap schools because he couldn't sit still at the other school and you know, all of these things that I was like, this is brilliant, like this is so, so clever. It's touching on things without necessarily a few other exact trying to explain everything. A few other examples, even in that same episode, is a Dad. It's in the military away from the fair. Yes, yes, interestingly, that voice of that father is the blue wiggles from the wiggles in that episode as well. Homes Blake. Yeah, like he's in that it is the father of the little boy. Yes, yeah, idhd the yeah, there you go, and he's also another episode two. And so Zoe Foster Blake, who is the creator of go to skin kids. All Intertwine Australia and there's Layne Beach Leash's under the surface. In one of the episodes there's a whole hibo comings. Yeah, another example where found was miscarriage. Yeah, there's an episode was very, very subtle and I think only a parent would pick it up. Obviously they don't make it aware, but there's an episode where talking about how blue was born and Louie has a Bingo, has a balloon under a shirt or something like that, or under a cloth or something. Yeah, and the bloom POPs and then Bennett puts his hand on being Chili's hand. Ley, I'm getting shimmers. Yeah, until I am trying to say we haven't had a miscarriage but yeah, we haven't gone through that experience with a lot of our family and friends have where and it's can be a very hard subject to cover. But to just have that nod, wow, that not to get this experience. That is how for something get more and more and you know the way you're talking about it now, to me, who's not watched nearly as many episodes, you know, I'm already feeling like this is so good. You know, this is this is what you want your kids to be watching. Right like to have these, and I think that's this is what we've got to understand from a brand perspective. Is it that that essence of what the brand is about which allows people to want to share? You want to talk about it, want to share elements of it that really kind of touch them and and you know, yes, you might, your business might be a plumber right, but that doesn't mean you can't still create these connection, your connections exactly exactly. So I think you know, conscious of bringing it back into the brand and not just talking about all the episodes. But I feel like what what exactly? What just happened then is are sharing these. Our experience is around a particular brand which really connected with us, which made us want to talk about them. So that's really what you want exactly your brand to do? Yeah, the biggest thing for me is that the father in it a band. It makes me feel like it's such an inadequate father to do better. It's like, all right, come on, man, you showing me AP. Even like my kids here watching, like every time they is an episode there's something new thing of play. Don't we play key up you keep you a big dad. Can we go and jump on the trampoline. I'd can we do this? I'm like,...

...shame, here is your guess in terms of a parent, of when you get to these certain situations? What do you do here? So when you get to that point and there's a situation, you have your own child and they say the same thing that blue might ask or Bingo might ask their parents, and then you think back to it as appearing out. What did they do? Maybe if to try this or give it a go? I saw it. Yeah, whole thing on that. That was they were saying that they've even schools and education. I think it was. was starting to use what would bandit do, like, which is a little bit of a play on that religious thing of what would Jesus do? But you know, what would bandit do? Was this thing exactly what you're saying there is well, how would bandit deal with the situation? That would he would he bring in play? And if you listen back to season one we had my great friend and clients, Sarah Brodrick, from connected children on and one of as an occupational therapist, one of the huge things that she promotes is all about play and how play with your children is one of the best ways to to move through difficult times, to understand behaviors, to kind of distress, all of these sorts of things, and so I think what the show is really again promoting is that behavior. And so even if, even if, three times out of ten, you know you're able to choose play as a way to fix something, hasn't that done had an amazing impact on you as a parent, you know, to be able to go what did band to do? And then go, okay, well, he, you know, played that game on the other Games. But yeah, what did you say? Keep you uppy, keep you happy with a balloon, especially an international tournament, and I found Sim for there. Are you going on the news other day? I don't know, and we definitely play keep you up here. So's they did not have a name. Yeah, but in terms of day, if you applied that sort of the same idea to your own business, own brand of what am I going to be remembered for and what, how am I going to come to mind in these situations where somethink like my service or product is needed at that time? Yeah, in terms of this, obviously I think of blue when there's a parenting situation where things are going hey wire and I need to step up and as a parent and not just get annoyed or whatever. It is something constructive, Yep, which is hard itself. But yeah, well, think of Louis all, think of something someone else has told me. Whatever it is, it's that whole mark back to what you first thinking about what they said. Yeah, and, and I think I'm again so when we think about, you know, even typical buying behavior. So, yes, people are watching this on free to air or they're choosing to download and watch it on I view in Australia or any number of places, right, but when people are choosing to buy the products, I actually you know so, and we'll talk about that in a bit. But there's a huge, like massive range now of blue products, absolutely branded products, right, and I actually honestly think that what they've now been able to do is corner this market where people genuinely feel proud to be a supporter of blue. It's a bit like a sporting club. We're like, yeah, exact another brand where they just feel so they feel like they're part of a tribe or a group or you know, and not if you know, like I had a friend, went to friend's house and she had her kid gave my baby a a little busting because that's the Bluey car and I was like, uh, didn't know that, but now I see it everywhere right. So she was like, you know, she was happy. She wasn't, she didn't. She didn't even need to tell me that that was the blue car. Like I didn't need to know that it was the blue car, but it was a thing of saying, you know, I've bought something from blue but I get was this kind of like owed to? I'm happy to support this because I actually think it's really great. And so while they've cornered this kid market, they've made they've made parents very happy to purchase products under this brand, more so than, I would say, any of the others, you know, like the wiggles or the play schools or the maybe, yeah, maybe there's a mix there, but I think people maybe more than the pepper pigs or the you know, often you'll see people like to wear the pepper my kid to weather, but they're probably quite happy for them to wear the Bluey thing. So you know, it's that it's that interesting mix between parents feeling really proud to kind of promote this brand with their kids and the other ones where their kids are just like desperate to buy the thing and they're be like, oh, how do they have to wear that? Some of the components in that. I think that's an Australian brand to yeah, you know, people buy an Australian either made or conceived product or whatever it is. It wouldn't that had nothing to do with the strategy or done in China, but we still seek some connection. Yeah, but there's that to I mean there's even the association that it's on in Australia. The Australian Broadcasting Corporation, ABC is of trusted brands. If it's on that, it's it's...

...something that's approved. At least that. Yeah, kid friendly. Yeah, there's a lot of things that go into what makes this brand something that people can trust and that's a lot of that signaling, which we've sort of touched on before exactly. So there's a lot going for it in terms of how it it connects with its target market positions. itself is something that is not offensive, that is easily engaged with, and then educational, educational, and then you fall into the ecosystem of what the brand offers to be interested and wanting, yet maybe not needing. It's not really a necessity to have this in your life, but it's a want there to be part of that brand experience, that ecosystem of what they've built. Yeah, to all these different things. So let's tap into the messaging side of things, because they're not like a typical Raum or you'd have, you know, tagline and you know ky kind of value propositions and all the rest of that kind of thing. This is a little bit different, where it's within the language of what the show presents as. So be the tone of voice, be the dynamic of the family interaction and even with that interaction with the rest of society in their little world, and things that you sort of take away from to make something that is some key messages that people remember the show for. That's yeah, that way, Yep, Yep, Yep. Yeah, so I think there's I think that we in use mentioned before about the values in those sorts of things. I think as a TV show they definitely have a set of values that they will be delivering in every episode. So certain things that they want to make sure that they're conveying and definitely one of those is that that theme of play. And last week we touched on that. You know, single theme, I think it was last week with pet barm yeah, care, and so with this one. You know, I feel like that's one of their key things, is this idea of play and reconnecting to you know, reconnecting to each other through play as a family. And so I feel like some of their values are kind of definitely just as you said, like integrated with all of the language, all of the tone that they use as a brand, all of the way that they speak to each other, all of those is and things actually a really good example of when you build a brand personality for a brand. This is this. Is that an example of how that can play out, because they are actually personalities. Or I can if they had three values, they'd be play, family and learning. Yes, if they did that, you can see how they transcend throughout the whole yet broken the clay connection learning, but family is, you know very well. Yeah, I agree. I agree. I think that and that's really nice to be able to kind of pull back on and look at without them the necessarily putting that on the website. You know, we've been able to identify what their values are now, whether they're slightly different to that or not would be interesting. But you know what it's, it's communicating what, you know, US as consumers or an audience to them, are experiencing, understanding those, those values in part of the show and that's something really, really all want to connect to, right, because it feels feels good. Yeah, I mean, for me, the the theme of the show is that blue's described as an as an inexhaustible six year old be four year old son, Blue Healer Dog, WHO's trying to go through life and learn life's lessons as she goes, either through things of interacting with her sister, to with her parents, with their friends and even her cousins and other family as an extension of the heal of family. But, you know, takes play and turns it into everyday, you know, family life of ex what they call extraordinary adventures. Sounds so epic. Of what they do and the experience that you get as a result of watching it is is next level in the some reasons why, but we'll go into that in a sect. But yeah, it's developing her imagination as a child as well as her mental, physical and emotional resilience. And Yeah, to see if that character develops into if they progress the series and the characters get a little bit older. MMM, that might be interesting to see if they did like a spinoff thing where they either got older or it focuses on other characters that are older. Maybe. I don't know, it'd be yeah, I don't know what they would do either because, like never happened in the simpsons. They never got older, didn't the thing, this is what I wonder about. The voices that they use for the girls for being going Louie. Is that the young girls, like the kids? Yeah, some of the producers. Yeah, they're growing up. I'm very quickly. And the voice. Where's The simpsons, which hues adult voices to play? Yes, child characters. MMM. So, yeah, it's a very it's going to be interesting to see where they go. Definitely, unless they just stick, if they're punching out so many episodes, like they've got a hundred and five already, if this season four is another thirty or forty. Yeah like that. They could finish it season five and make me meant you know, they'll just keep playing a play and playing until the...

...end of days. I wonder what would happen though, because like it compared to something like play school or the wiggles where they have just kept going for decades and decades, you know, and the people have gotten older or they've changed position roles and you know those sorts of things. Like all you see them like aging dramatically, kind of like yeah, kind of like think, well, what, what's what will happen with a show is where it's not real life people. I mean pepper pig, they've never aged. That's been around for years. They've never gotten older. So maybe they do, but I also don't have many episodes something like pepper pigs done. So it is interesting to kind of think about what what they'll end up doing, because they do have such a strong brand. And will it be something where they just keep, you know, recycling? I really think it could be a brand that could expand into different families, not just be yes, the characters and introduce your kids voices. They'd have a whole pland strange old yeah, I'm sure. In terms of what you could do as a strategy here is how do you evolve your brand over time? This is an example of that. Is Either, in their instance, it's change the kids voices expand into different lateral niche kind of yeah, wise you could talk about the same thing in the same kind of ecosystem, the world's. They're always to really think to be perfect one. It's you go for on and on and on. But yeah, yeah, no, it's going to be interesting to follow what they decide to do and obviously it's been a great win for the lifelow studio. So Blood Ludo, Ludo, Studio Ludo. Yeah, and idea. Yeah, I always add an extra letter into those sorts of things. You know, we habit of mine. Sure it's Dyslexia, but yeah, one of the key messages for me is always that constructive parenting message. Yes, I just like you can, you can lose your with you can bet your wits end and lose your temper or whatever, but it's not as responsive from kids as faction. Yeah, that connection of playing with them or getting down to their level and talking to them, to visit. There's one episode where blue wants to get to the park and bannets. They're taking both Bluie and Bingo with him in this little cart and they keep getting stopped by people that bandit knows. So the band it's talking to these people, Friends of theirs and exactly my life. Yeah, and he's not having it. He she's just like I, Dad, Dad, we need to get the part any of the party. And Benne gets to the point where just kind of loses his temper a little bit and just says, Bluie, I'm talking to somebody, and she gets a bit, you know, trodden because of it, and he then turns to offer and says, look, when I'm talking to an adult here, I would wouldn't mind if you didn't interrupt me. Kind of thing, and you know, if you do need to talk to me, just pull on my hand or and I'll know that you need to talk to me. Yeah, and she tells her and says, how about we just go to the park and you don't talk to any adults and as how about you don't tell me what to do? And I was like Whoa, okay, that's an interesting way of playing it, but yeah, child might not take it away as as it being offensive. Like you, if you did that on an adult, you'd be slightly yeah, you don't tell me what to do, but just those constructive messages, which might be firm potentially, but a lot of the time it isn't. But it's done in a way that disarms the situation, at least gets the root of what the problem is, how do we solve it and then let's do something about it. Kind of thing. Well, I's and I think that's probably why it's created such brilliant connections, is because it's actually reflecting real life frustration of parenting, which you know off air, you and I've spoken about at length, and all parents experience this right. It is a very, very highly frustrating role to be a parent. And so where the show like this goes, I see you, I see how hard it is to be a parent and to try and be respectful and diligent and understanding and all these things, but you're also exhausted and you do want to maybe talk to your friend. We do want to have that conversation and you do have like some status there to be seen to be communicating with another adult, and you're all of these things, like there's all these things that come into play. But the for the show to kind of address that and say, I understand how frustrating that is and you might get angry or frustrated about it, but how about then you follow on with this, like this is actually going to help you solve the problem with your child as opposed to just being angry and frustrated. So I think, I think that's but I think that's why it's it has the following it does because it's not pretending to be something. It's not like it's dead, it's it's providing solution. So, if we think about it again, it's brand like you can address all those pain points that your clients have. So all of the things that your clients are struggling with day in, day out, whether it so they let's say it's our planning plumbing business, right, like, maybe they are just sick of their drain being blocked and they've done all the things that they could get over the shop, but that's still constantly having a blocked drain problem. Right, if you can, and that means like...

...that the water comes out of the toilet, or that means that, you know, the shower is whatever, they can they can't get their shower or they can't wash their kids or whatever, if you can connect to the pain points of your audience and actually show empathy towards them, but then offer a solution like you have ticked all the boxes, you know, and that is exactly what blue is doing. It's going we see you, we see how frustrating it is. We've got full empathy for your role as a father or mother and we're going to help you with a couple of suggestions on how this might work out better for you. Even one episode where Chili, the mother, just loses it, likes is a cause just get so frustrated. She can't get at the door because she's so wound up that she needs to be somewhere to be a good parent. And you know, in the eyes of another parent and the yeah, it's just like you need to listen to us. Kind of think it without saying you need to listen to us. She finally listens and just says, yeah, you know what, it's not that important. It's okay, we don't need to worry about going there. That's fine. Yeah, yeah, no, it's and I think that's it. Like, I think that's why it's idiot. It's just hit a chord with so many people because I think genuinely people want to be better parents. Like I think it's an ongoing thing that parents want to be better at what they're doing. Kids probably don't watch it thinking that at all. Actually, I'm sure. I hope it off, but I think. I think that maybe they're also learning ways of of interacting with adults right, like that's another thing too. That's that's Importan they're showing that mutual respect and and so, yeah, it's definitely it's definitely got some beautiful signaling, beautiful messaging, beautiful kind of ideas that it's putting into all of their audiences mind. So there's one part to messaging, which is something that you can do in your own brand, as well as a tone of voice of how you communicate. And yes, for blue it's quintessentially busy accents. And if you, if you're an international listener of this podcast and you do watch blue, you'll, I think, they don't broadcast changing the the accents or they don't change the accent. Yeah, you're communicating a brand that on paper, when you first interact with it, it's not an accent, it's of your region. If you're in the UK or the USA, hearing something different. So that's it's one thing that's connecting you to a different kind of brand here and you're remembering it for those of its auzy accents. Yeah, for an Australian it's relatable. The same accents that you're using, your kids are using, your talking to the same way and you're talking about these different kind of things that might not make sense to an overseas audience. Like they use the word doney instead of a toilet, but they kind of explain that. I'll concept what it is. So it internationally is. Yeah, we get it. Yeah, they using these kind of vernacular that's very Australian. Yeah, like things like they've got that. I've seen a lot of stuff where they say what I could do and they, you know, they've used kind of got these words that they've created which now, and you said one the other day, instead of swearing, they say something blue. I'm not sure sure you said it and I didn't know any sense from Louis Anyway. Anyway. Yeah, so there's another like a yet. So they use words that then people, kids pick up on as using, as well as kind of like, as you know, keep you upeople, all of these sorts of things where again, it kind of connects you back to the show and connect your back to the brand and and that tone of voice being about play and maybe you know. I don't know about you, but in our family we make up lots of words and names all the time, like my kids are forever doing it and my dad did it and I do it, and so it's this kind of idea that is I don't know whether it's not, whether it is just Australian, but this idea of kind of making up makeshift names and words for things that are that again connects you back to that play idea calling each other names like Cheryl Lander. Or do you do that in your fabric? Yeah, almost like goose. Sometimes it will goose. Is All right, goose again. But yeah, no, I think. I think coming back to that messaging is that, you know, there's some key messages there, but essentially it's done a really good job of kind of portraying a tone of voice for the whole the whole show, the whole brand as a whole, which we kind of feel, again as an audience, really connected to. And it's very similar for how they visually treat what they have produced here, because, I mean it's an animated show. It's a very visual experience here in the style which this leads into the logo and yeah, colors and forsib every dot and the visual style of things that it's very dam like. There's no other animated show out that it is like it. It's a very unique style of animation. Yeah, very clever animation style that taps into the Australian kind of landscape, especially in Queensland. Words. Yeah, Brisbane, it's very hilly and it has all these little nods to to the area and that city that they're based in. The has it against it was in Sydney. There be these little things that I'd understand a little bit more. Yeah, but I sense some videos that they pointed out. There's even like this, you know, Panorama kind of shot from where their balcony is and you can see out to Brisbane.

There's this at Cathedral that you can see. I can notice it, or you see the city scape and yeah, it's yeah, you know it's Brisbane and you know it's very, very clever, but very immilling to look at though as well. Yeah, color pellette and yeah, it's not too for in your face or two oversaturated, especially when you counter it to other cartoon, you know animated show. It's like, if you think about pepper pig, that like it's so simplistic in that in the illustration style, whereas blue he's kind of yet, as you see, like it's definitely got detail and it's got kind of interest. It's again marrying that relationship between appealing to children but also like going, like having a nod to parents and what they will understand. So it's yeah, it's got it's a sophisticated style as well, I would say. Yeah, yeah, and you know from I'm pretty sure this was the case, that when they first started animating this it was done by university students. HMM. Yeah, time and graduates and things like, building that school world of animation to make something that was made in Australia for Australians by type of thing. Yeah, it's a nice little nod there. But terms of their branding elements, let's say like their logo, they've got that kind of custom cloudy looking font that they've made, the bubbly sort of dancy thing with it extended. Why? And it's funny because, like, if you look at it as a as a you know, in a balanced sense, it's it's, you know, at the bit over the Surup. But but yeah, but I think it, you know, it's got it. You know, screams play, it's screams, children at screams, all of them not actually screams, but you know, it tells you all of those things straightaway. And and blue he's like the word market itself is there, but then also the character of blue eye is often connected to it. So you kind of have this, you know again like this visual end of yeah, face, the brand right there, and that's at that iconography as well. So yeah, definitely very, very iconic word mark in illustration style, that consistent shade of blue, this light kind of Sky Blue, which is used throughout everything. It's become, you know, just synonymous in fact, that my sister and her partner shared a photo on our family what'SAPP thread the other day of at a wedding and her partners of a Cherry and was wearing this blue tie and it had it was actually blue with flags and flowers on it, but from the distance and my brother message he said I thought he was wearing a blue tie because the blue was the blue blue, ee right, so blue. Yeah, yeah. So it's really interesting how you know just so quickly a color can connect and you wouldn't we figure about this lot. So that color that can connect you back to something that you know to be true. So you know that that blue is Bluey and of and actually it wouldn't be that weird for him to be wearing a blue tie anyway. Like, you know, why not? Yeah, so I think, I think that that's, you know, an example of just how strong color can really be when it's connected to, you know, a strong brand as well. Yeah, like that. Even the title sequences, they kind of brand that, not just the opening titles, but they haven't a title card for their episode name. So yes, uppy, there's a keep up thing. I has a little illustrative element but still has that blue kind of it's nearly a gradient as well. YEA, it is some type style and all the rest of it. And the same with their end credits. Is the same kind of treatment. Again, they might have a little character running around or doing something or standing there, Yees, at the end of the episode, which is, you know, makes it just a nice it's very recognizable in terms of its elements. Yeah, surely that you know, and your turn an's like, oh, that's a blue episode. That yeah, specially that had that experience with it to know the brand at least. But this is the other part of branding that not so much of the visual but other experiential parts of which which will get into now. The brand experience is this. Don't be ready. What is it? Oh, what comes next? Is it? Dad? So the theme music is again. You hear that little Ban Joey kind of little yeah, drum and and little, I don't know what other things like, maybe as a harmonica and no tuber or something can there, whatever it might be, just that sound you can hear if it comes on the TV eight o'clock in the morning here does like yes, can seven minutes here in the other room. Yeah, you've got seven eight minutes to have your kids in front of it and go a Louis on and I'll just like run to the count or my son. Don't yeah,...

...but it doesn't yet happily sit there and watch a kind of thing and be captivated by it. But to have a regional theme music that is attributed only to you and to you only as a brand. It's fantastic and a lot of brands are utilizing it, but a lot of brands can't utilize it a lot of the time, just depending on what type of and of they are and what type of access it yeah, exactly touch points where you have a consumer or a customer interact with you so if you do advertising, freedom had a new kind of sound that they had the advertising. Those pretty much the only place you'd really hear it. But still it's an iconic part that adds to the brain experience at least. Yeah, and you know, for their music being originally composed, isn't just the title music, it's also other songs throughout the whole yeah, episode, which adds a level of experience to something that sets the tones. It's a mood. Yeah, it's happy, if it's if it's anthemic or something, it's building, it's crescendoing. To see those things. Well, even like when we, you know, made the decisions for the music, we swapped between our, Oh yeah, both seasons of our podcast, right, and so, and that's that's been a really big thing because I think that, you know, when we were deciding on it as well, it gets you in the mood for something and it prepares you. And so I think it's, you know, when we again think about how does this make someone feel when they interact with either the brand or when they see the logo, when they see, you know, the photography or when they see the colors, like, what does it make you feel? And so obviously there's contact to that. But you know, now, when you hear that joyful song at the beginning, you go great, this is you know, I'm excited, this is fun, we're going to watch something, whatever. Yeah, I'm prepared for it and you know what to expect, and I think that's it. You know, even when with your trivia question the beginning, is that idea of yeah, Asi, kids are weak, because kids high. Now it's in my head. I zink, he's a week bix kids, you know. So that's that whole thing comes back again to thinking, you know, that tune that you go along with. It makes you kind of remember and think about that brand and know what to expect. And so, yeah, it's definitely it's there's definitely brands that can really utilize it and others that it's a lot harder. Again, our plumber, but you know, and that's not to say that our plumber couldn't go all out on you doing some youtube, yes, and youtube stuff and have their theme song and that that's what you always think about. I'm unlocking a dray, get into my Jingling, my jingle role that I wish I had. Yeah, exactly. So I think there's a I think that there's real value in having in that sort of sonic branding that we've passed on before, but even not have it like even just having there is a lot of classical music in there that's recomposed into their kind of style, which I think is quite nice thing, rather than have real poppy kind of music that you might see you on something that's too over dramatic or whatever. It's just has that nice playful feel to it. Yeah, there's a few songs. There's one where they go to bed and it's this whole bedtime routine and then they're trying to get to sleep and they Christian. There's all the way to the end where the sun starts coming up, but the music in that, I think finish the last season is just a pick. So what did I just watch? M It's fantastic and I think they want to award because of it that a particular episode. But yeah, it just kind of sets that mood and you walk away feeling a lot more complete than just watching some animated show. It's one of those jigsaw puzzle pieces that you put together with everything else that you experience and it just feels like a more wholesome yeah, brand experience at things. Yeah, yeah, and I think we you know, another part of it is that they interact. It's not just this is us, this is us and this is us. Like they do a lot of other things that connect family and children. So like they do, you know, suggesting, sharing, like they had, like shared recipes and activities you can do with your kids and coloring in you can do and things that you can make and like, you know, supporting different kind of court like days, you know, those sorts of things, event days. So I feel like they're, you know, again like feeding back into that idea of connection between family and play and, you know, again like reinvigorating that. And so as a brand, when you know you go, what am I going to make for Halloween or whatever, you might actually think I saw that thing on blue or on the on the you know, their socials or on their so. So definitely, like the blue social media page is not directed for small children. The facebook page is for the parents, right and so. And the website, you know, there's not there. The website does have obviously episodes playing and it's in the full style, but there's also all these bits that you know, parents can do, which again is like this, you know, almost like that when you go, I've got that seven to eight minutes of the episode. It's like I've got this activity now I can do...

...so they're kind of like he just if this helpful role to parents as well, which is why, again, it's, you know, building. It's got such a following, I think because it's just you feel like it's wholesome, you feel like it's you've enjoyed the interaction with the brand so many times that now kind of what they put forward you would probably trust anyway. Right. So, if they said let's make spooky carved capsicums, you go, it seems like a good idea. You'll come around to it. Just do that. So yeah, so in terms of where the blue he is become now, a brand, a consumer brand, is that they have all these now maybe just distinctive our sets, but things that you can buy and get your hands on. Yeah, you know, distinctive us is, obviously, is what the characters look like and sound like, obviously, but in terms of that real world experience, you've got music albums, you have toys, games, books, play equipment for swimming or for bikes and things, arts and crafts. We've got these ceramic blue figures. You paint them kind of things like when you go to if you ever did that with yourself as a kid, plaster of Pairs Places. Oh yeah, Yah, yeah, I'm done. You got clothes and dress up. So I got my kid has blue underwear absolutely and shakes and she oh yeah, yeah, she tumitations. And spotlight has a full ill U sand with not this as a full range of spot of blue merchandise now like it is. It is, yeah, for all the things. So it is literally everywhere. And and even you know that idea of Boll you get a blue tie. So adults and and and them mums who do. So that was a funny story, the mums who do that podcast. So I'd actually seen them on hard quiz. The one of the mums who does that blue podcast which is called, I should actually say the name got to be done. That a blue podcast. And so one of the mum's from that was on hard quiz on the ABC and she was like just this massive Bluey fan that she's like got tattoos and blue like, you know, like she is just loving it. And so it's you know, it's really just expanded into this huge range of of fandom like people just you know, and some of the Bluey like bonds, things will sell for, you know, stupid money. Yeah, that's it. Collectors. Those brand partnerships, bit spotlight or bonds and having, you know, clothing for kids, fire bonds. You know, you tie two brands that are trusted for clock like on for clothing, on one for the entertainment factor, you've got a match made in heaven kind of thing. Hmmm, absolutely. Their Board Games is I think I can't remember what the brand is of. Told my head was a very well known toy bread. See that Mattel or something like that. It's all all those toys. So it's again fitting into me. Yea, I remember was some think it was. It wasn't motel, but it was a yes, something like that. Yeah, anyway, that's a good but those even connections like that's even played out in the show too. I think we mentioned this in bunning's episode, bunnings episode we did, where bunning there's a bunning's in blue, but it's called HAMMERBARN. That's fine. My say calls a Hammiban that. He doesn't call it bunnings. I mean he knows this bunnings too. But yeah, it's like, Oh yeah, a Bun, that's funny, but twice on the weekend. I love it. I love it. This is associations, the Weir the most interesting one for me. Well, two of them actually. One of them was commemorative birth certificates. Yes, yeah, we's not want in New South Wales it didn't. They have them for like footy teams here and your South Wales, which I think is just ridiculous. It's kind of gross. But for blue though, I think it's just kind of fitting, at least if you got an older child and another one comes along and it's not the actual birthagig, it's just a commemorative piece of paper that it's Nice. Yeah, you can get as an option, but that was interesting. But the other one I didn't even have any idea about was bluey live on stage. Oh Yeah, yes, but we have. You have been in lockdown for a million years, though, so you don't know my fonerable city things happening. Yeah, my Father Law city sort ads for it. For Country South Wales. They were touring around and then stopped just before or just as the we went into lockdown here in your South Wales, and so they starting back up at an Opera House here and soon I was looking at the tickets. I like, I don't know my son able to sit through that. It's still to be perfectly honest, but they're pretty yeah, those, I mean we've done getting to stage performances again at you know, it's a huge excitement, like it's again that fandom right where you have people lining up for tickets because they do love the the show so much. And Look, I've done that several times for play school. We've done we were my o older boys are big place school fans and again I had that same kind of like memory...

...of place school. I actually did work experience there when I think, great ten and so loved it and yeah, so you know I have. I have those sort of childhood connections as well. But you know, going to see it on on stage is like this whole new level. It's like this is actually like real life now, you know, it's taken it from the screen and so so, but it's a huge it's another huge, you know, boost for the brand and you know, you could like and it to those ideas of life, you know, life conferences or live you know, we're what's events and things. Yeah, community events or where you're at a were, a Bo so like a sale show and that sort of stuff, where you're actually in finally, like presenting or interacting with people, most of us. Yeah, exactly. So, so it's this and again you're bringing people together who are fans, right. So you've got that kind of tribe where, you know, the bee at the Blue Show, you with all these other people who other you, like comic con or something like that. Yeah, we got to design conferences. You're with other designers in the room. Exactly, great shows. Yes, one, that's the word, I think. Yeah, if you're a brand, you want to connect with either consumers or maybe interact with new people that are looking at other people and getting on the radar, or even people that you could partner with, create some partnerships with as a brand. You know, doing those kinds of events can help in terms of networking. Yeah, yeah, exactly. Ran Out there that little bit more and get some more visibility out there in different ways. Not Again, not all brands can't or businesses generally will. But yeah, if you're the tribes means that you can think about equally is that. Is that where your people are? My people here? Could I is this a way I could get my people together, you know, in the an opportunity here to do more. So I think. I think again, that's when we look at we've talked about this before, but when you follow the you know, success leaves close. What was the word? Clues? That was it fun? That doesn't make sense. Steps. Well, in Telly Robins, he probably have bigger foot scoops. But yeah, like, when you think about that, it's a really important thing of going what know, what does work for other businesses and can I see how any of those things that those brands have done can help, you know, my brand. And and it's not there's not a you know, set formula, but it's like looking at what what's working? How can I better connect, happen I better serve all those sorts of things. So, yeah, well, I think that's a good way to wrapp up. Is Blue episode ten. So ten. We always ended this things like this. Just delphee frank like this brand. I think it hate. It hasn't been to me that we've been like and I think that's what's Nice. When you, you know, delve into kind of brands and you get to learn more about them, you often have like more respects there that's true. They only hate. We're too nice, though, so we've who wouldn't do that one? Yeah, but, yeah, no, of course we, you know, big fans. I'm excited at to be able to embark on the new the Bluey adventure with my toddler, and you know that's excited. Excited gets stepped I'm taking as a parent and I'm learned something a bit, you know, raising little girls kid. Yeah, well, that's right. Well, what you'll probably learned is that you don't have to be it doesn't have to be wildly different. About the genders. No, but you'll probably learns. Hope she's a little gentle of them myself. Well, Oh, they're all different. Thanks here, old parents other side. Yeah, thank you so much for shooting in to this ten episodes the season two. Yeah, thank you. We've kept consistent with kept on the money here of being on the same tune so that you rock up to the same experience time and time again. We do mix it up, obviously in these episodes that you have listened to. Hopefully, if it's all of them well done, you get a little because of them. We'd love you to let us know, please, like if you genuinely listened to all. Let's tell us. We will give you like a shout out of the Seni Yeah, next season. Everyone's forgotten about it. We can make a thing to like a you can get a be on something. Will work that out. You the IPS well to Tattoo or yourself. Know what any is is there. You Go. Well, you, hopefully. If you'd like to connect with us, of course you can follow us at branding banter on Instagram, and you can find both our respective websites and social media in the show notes. We also, you know, always love feedback, as we've said every week, anything that you want to share with us. We really value it. We put it a lot of effort into previous episodes together. So we're grateful for any kind of you know, feedback, reviews on apple podcasts, anything like that that you can give us and let us know, you know, maybe what you're thinking about four, season three or what you've enjoyed most everything else. Freak. Yeah, that's it. I mean if there's a some idea that you have what could be good for season three,...

...if it is that I did that we said at the start of it, or of taking brands at ant so well known. What could be done to enhance it? Yeah, you know, maybe if it's a broad critique on your own brand. Yeah, and we can give you some pointers here. Is a bit of a free, free bee for content breaks. Exchange for that contation learns make out of it. We might tear it apart and put it back together. Who knows? Yeah, yeah, but, yeah, look, until next until next year, yes, because it's already for us, it's already mid November, early November, so when this is being recorded. And Yeah, we're we're going to take a break until next year with all the things that. We wish you all a safe and healthy, happy festive season and, of view, time and two thousand and twenty. What too is which is better? Years are right, I know. Thanks, frank, for all your work. As always, really enjoy being able to share this experience with you and grateful for all that you do. So thank you all the love. All right, we're out of here. So much for this season. We'll see you next episode and till then, have a banter about branding if you can, and we'll see you soon. By I don't know how to hear this.

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